Entertainment

Women always bother me for a topless pic

JOE WICKS pulls faces and Zoolander-style poses in front of our camera, which he wants to send to his model wife Rosie Jones.

She’s never far from his thoughts — he talks about her and their two kids constantly throughout the day — so he’s more than willing to look a little goofy if he thinks it’ll make her laugh.

Joe is more than willing to look a little silly if he thinks it will make his wife laugh

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Joe is more than willing to look a little silly if he thinks it will make his wife laugh
His wife, model Rosie Jones, is never far from his thoughts

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His wife, model Rosie Jones, is never far from his thoughts

But despite his cute antics, Joe insists he’s actually “very confident” — he gasps when I suggest that with moves like his, maybe he should sign up for Strictly Come Dancing.

“I’ve been asked a few times,” he says. “But really, twirling around on TV sober in a leotard? I can’t think of anything worse.”

Joe, 36, is an unlikely star in many ways – one of the first influencers to rise to mainstream fame thanks to fitness and food posts on Instagram, and then catapulted to national treasure status through his PE With Joe workouts during Covid lockdowns.

His YouTube exercise classes – aimed at children but also loved by parents – drew record-breaking viewership, saw him donate £600,000 to NHS charities and secured him an MBE, which he will pick up later this month.

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He is now on the verge of publishing his eleventh book, Feel Good Food – recipes from which will be published in The Sun this weekend – which will become another bestseller.

“banging heads”

But Joe himself knows that everything could have been so different.

“I was a nightmare as a kid,” he recalls. “I was so cheeky and hyperactive.”

With a father addicted to heroin and a mother struggling with OCD and eating disorders, not much was expected of Joe.

Neighbors on their Surrey council estate used to say he and his two brothers ended up on drugs.

Joe says he was “anxious” and “constantly banged his head” with his mum – but maybe that’s no wonder, given his tough childhood.

“When my father was using drugs, we wanted to protect my mother from it,” he says. “All I knew was that my parents weren’t happy and I thought it was my fault.

“As a kid, you’re like, ‘Why does my dad disappear for months?

“Why can’t he just stop doing drugs?” But it’s not that simple, is it?”

Joe’s parents have since separated, but he has a good relationship with both of them.

He says it wasn’t until he grew up that he really appreciated what both of his parents went through.

He says with a sigh: “I wish they had communicated with me, but then they didn’t realize they had mental problems.

“My mom wasn’t diagnosed with eating disorders and OCD until later in life, and cleaning the house five times a day was just her way of handling things.”

Joe’s salvation came from practice – “my therapy since I was six” – and it would inspire PE With Joe many years later.

When my father was using drugs, we wanted to protect my mother from it. All I knew was that my parents weren’t happy, and I thought it was my fault. As a kid, you think, ‘Why does my father disappear for months? Why can’t he just stop doing drugs?’ But it’s not that simple, is it?

Joe Wicks about his father

He says: “When I was about 12 my secondary school took a group of naughty kids to a taster day at St Mary’s University in south west London because I knew we were on a certain path and wanted to change that.

“It was such a pivotal moment because I met all these incredible physical education students and I said to my mom, ‘I’m going to do that – I’m going to go to St. Mary’s and be a physical education teacher’.”

Joe actually made it to St. Mary’s – but when he went to work as a teaching assistant afterwards, he decided it wasn’t for him.

“It was a wake-up call, I realized I wasn’t patient enough – I couldn’t be a disciplinarian and admonish the kids,” he says, shaking his head.

“I went into personal training instead, but I guess I always had that in the back of my mind.

“When I was doing PE with Joe, I was doing what I would always do — but virtually.”

He calls his “proudest achievement” getting so many families moving when they were stuck indoors. His daily YouTube workouts came about as Joe imagined how he would have coped during lockdown as a recalcitrant kid, with no school, no gym and no socializing.

He says: “I just imagined being that boy in council housing again, with this crazy, chaotic family life – there’s no space, no space, you sit on top of each other. It was a driving feeling that I needed to do this for people’s mental health – help people move and let off some steam.”

But he wasn’t prepared for the reaction, which saw 80 million views of his 78 workouts – and means he’s now recognized everywhere he goes.

He says, “Nothing I do in my life will have as much impact as what I did back then in a global pandemic.”

I just imagined being that boy on council flats again, with this crazy, messy family life – there’s no room, no space, you sit on top of each other. It was a driving feeling that I needed to do this for people’s sanity – help people move and let off some steam.

Joe Wicks on his lockdown training

But for dad-of-two Joe, daily workouts were about both mental and physical health – and his new crusade is about how you can use both food and exercise to take care of your mental well-being.

Feel Good Food is a collection of 100 recipes designed to nourish and energize you to achieve a happier mindset. He says: “Many people don’t understand the connection between the food they eat and their mood.

“When you eat junk food that drains your energy, you feel irritable, grumpy — you don’t feel energized for the day. But going back to basics with wholesome ingredients — lots of veggies, color, herbs and spices — will make you feel good.”

Focusing on mental health has become a new priority for Joe, who made his name seven years ago with his promises to get you “Lean In 15” by burning fat with his short, sharp workouts and diet meals.

women in love

He says: “The message has changed over the years. If you think back to Lean In 15, it was all about losing weight and eating to get lean and all about physical appearance.

“But now I exercise because I love how it makes me feel and it makes me a better father and husband.

“It benefits me so much more than getting lean and fit.”

The star’s message may have changed, but so did social media, which is where Joe began his career as The Body Coach. When he started, influencers weren’t invented yet and people weren’t making money from their posts.

But book listings for the likes of Joe have changed all that, spawning an explosion of “fitfluencers” trying to follow in his footsteps.

So what does he think of them?

Joe chooses his words carefully: “It’s difficult to see true authenticity now.”

After the tremendous success of influencers like him, he admits that a lot of people get on social media and think, “Well, if I do that, I can get partnerships and brand money.”

Social media has also become increasingly toxic, but Joe says he’s trolling less now after PE With Joe.

He says: “There are very few negative feelings towards me these days. It used to annoy me – I would think I’m positive, so why are these people making life difficult for me? But I don’t even see it anymore.” The amorous female fans who used to slip into his DMs are gone too.

“I always used to be like that,” he says, laughing. “But back then, every shoot was like, ‘Okay, pick up a broccoli, shirt off, oiled up.’

Now he tends to leave his shirt on – and spends plenty of time opening up about his love for his wife Rosie, 32, whom he married in 2019, and children Indie, three, and two-year-old Marley.

He says, “People say they love seeing our family together instead.”

Images of the Wicks family feature prominently in Feel Good Food. He says: “I like to show my family. It shows that you can be very busy and have a successful career, but be there at important times of the day.”

As an incredibly proud dad, Joe says his instant mood booster is putting his phone down and taking the kids to the garden or on his bike. “Being a father has made me happier,” he says. “I’m more balanced now. It’s so easy to work, work, work and take advantage of every opportunity, but now I find the time to enjoy the little things.

“It’s non-negotiable that I bathe and read a book to the kids before bed. I’m so happy about that because I didn’t have that as a kid.”

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With so much enthusiasm for family life, Joe won’t stop at two kids. He says: “I want a big family, just like Rosie, so that’s definitely in our future.

“We always say at least four,” he says with a smile. “I just love watching them grow — there’s nothing quite like being a parent.”

  • Feel Good Food by Joe Wicks is released by HQ on Thursday priced at £20. And don’t miss tomorrow’s sun for a special supplement of 16 great recipes and more yummy treats in Sunday’s Fabulous magazine.
Joe says he was

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Joe says he was “anxious” and “constantly hitting his head with his mother.”
Joe kept talking about his wife and their two children throughout the day

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Joe kept talking about his wife and their two children throughout the day
Joe catapulted himself into national treasure status through his PE With Joe workouts during the Covid lockdowns

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Joe catapulted himself into national treasure status through his PE With Joe workouts during the Covid lockdowns
Despite his cleaning antics, Joe insists he's actually

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Despite his cleaning antics, Joe insists he’s actually “very confident.”
Feel Good Food, by Joe Wicks, will be released by HQ on Thursday

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Feel Good Food, by Joe Wicks, will be released by HQ on Thursday

https://www.thesun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/17911198/joe-wicks-chef-topless-pics-fans/ Women always bother me for a topless pic

Ashley

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