With Title 42 ending in less than a week, the Texas judge warns migrant crossings could surge to 4,500 a day

The tidal wave of migrants pouring across the US border seeking asylum could double after Title 42 is repealed, a Texas judge has warned.

El Paso County Judge Ricardo Samaniego, who is in regular close contact with border police and local authorities dealing with the migrant crisis, said the El Paso area, currently the busiest border crossing in the country, was in less than one week could experience a huge increase.

“From my understanding it could be as high as 4,200-4,500 from December 21st [people] per day – which would double our current fears,” Samaniego told Border Report.

Title 42 is a measure asserted amid the COVID pandemic that allows Border Patrol to bar migrants from certain countries from entering the United States on public health grounds. It was used to bar nearly 40% of all cross-border workers from entering the country but was recently struck down by a federal judge.

The El Paso influx is meant to signify what will happen across the entire southern border. In May, Alejandro Mayorkas, the under-fire Department head of Homeland Security, even admitted that up to 18,000 people a day could enter the US from Mexico after Title 42 ends, saying it would put his department under “extraordinary strains.”

border crisis
Title 42 allows Border Patrol to bar migrants from certain countries from entering the United States on public health grounds.
USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA

The city of El Paso has seen huge swarms of immigrants cross the border in 2022 and spent $10 million to house, feed and bus migrants to cities like New York before they leave, citing rising costs withdrew. Last week, local leaders still called the situation a “crisis managed” and hoped to avoid “chaos”.

That chaos came over the weekend, however, when more than 1,500 migrants flooded the border and agents were processing 2,400 people a day — the crowd they should previously be preparing for once Title 42 was lifted, which has seriously overwhelmed the city — with over 5,000 Migrants in custody and no place in emergency shelters, leaving 900 processed migrants thrown out on the streets, according to the city’s publicly released data.

Those who slept on the streets of downtown El Paso braved freezing temperatures. Four migrants were beaten and robbed while waiting for a bus out of town, the El Paso Police Department said in a news release.

To ease the number of people, Border Patrol is flying migrants out of the city just to process them, the agency confirmed to The Post on Wednesday. Migrants are flown on Immigration and Customs Enforcement planes to processing centers across the southern border, where their biometrics are taken and extensive background checks are carried out.

Meanwhile, Border Patrol agents assigned to other parts of the border have been moved to El Paso and over 1,000 non-agent staff have been hired to process migrants so agents can continue patrolling the border, a spokesman for the US said -Customs and Border Protection said the Post.

migrants
The city of El Paso spent $10 million housing, feeding and transporting migrants.
USA TODAY NETWORK/Sipa USA

The county is considering opening a shelter to discourage migrants from sleeping on the streets. Currently, neither the city nor the county offer shelters to migrants — except for the city, which pays for hotel rooms for those who test positive for COVID-19 to quarantine them.

The El Paso rescue mission said it accommodated over 260 people, although it only has a capacity of 190, according to KDBC-TV.

“We’ve never seen anything like it before,” Rescue Mission CEO Blake Barrow told local broadcaster.

Space is so tight that the mission allows people to sleep in their lobby and library.

“Are we spinning in the ocean? Yeah, but turn around and look at all those kids on the porch,” Burrow said. “We must do what we can to take care of her.”

https://nypost.com/2022/12/14/with-title-42-ending-in-less-than-a-week-texas-judge-warns-migrant-crossings-could-surge-to-4500-a-day/ With Title 42 ending in less than a week, the Texas judge warns migrant crossings could surge to 4,500 a day

JACLYN DIAZ

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