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Winter Storm Kenan path tracker LIVE – Travel disruption as 4,500 flights canceled after more than 24 inches of snow

OVER 4,500 flights were canceled over the weekend as Storm Kenan brought feet of snow to Boston, New York City and much of the east coast.

FlightAware showed 3,500 flights canceled Saturday, including almost every flight through Boston. 1,200 Sunday flights were canceled.

Boston saw more than 2 feet (61 centimeters) of snow in some areas, as well as dangerous coastal conditions and devastating winds.

Winds gusted at 70 mph (113 kph) or higher at several spots in Massachusetts, including Nantucket Island and Provincetown, at the tip of Cape Cod.

And parts of New Jersey and Long Island saw 18 inches (45 centimeters) of snow on Saturday..

The Nor’easter blanketed a large swath of New England with heavy snowfall, which also brought road closures and Amtrak service cancelations.

“It’s high winds, heavy snow, blizzard conditions – all the elements of a classic nor’easter,” New York Governor Kathy Hochul said at a news briefing, warning of frigid temperatures overnight. “This could be life-threatening.”

Several states along the northeast coast declared emergencies in response to the storm, which formed in the Atlantic Ocean off the Carolinas and was forecast to continue depositing snow through Saturday evening as it moved north.

Read our bomb cyclone path tracker for the latest news and updates…

  • Boston-area grocery stores emptied

    Ahead of the storm, Boston-area shoppers cleared out local grocery stores, stocking up for the severe weather ahead.

    Twitter users shared photos of empty shelves on Friday evening.

  • New York under state of emergency

    Governor Kathy Hochul announced that a state of emergency is in effect as of 8pm Friday night.

    The Long Island Rail Road shut down overnight, though the MTA announced service should be restored Monday morning ahead of the work week commute.

  • ‘Hurricane-strength’ winds expected

    AccuWeather reported that hurricane-strength winds could be part of this storm.

    “Everything is on the table with this storm,” AccuWeather Chief On-Air Meteorologist Bernie Rayno said Thursday.

    “Winds will become a major problem. This could be a real damaging storm,” Rayno said.

  • Cities warned of coastal flooding

    The National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office in Boston says that coastal flooding is possible due to the storm.

    But because of the uncertainty that remains relating to the storm’s path, it’s unclear to what extent there may be coastal flooding.

    The stronger the storm, the greater the storm surge will be along the coast, according to CNN.

  • Where do ‘bomb cyclones’ occur?

    “Bomb” cyclones occur most frequently along coastlines where warm water is.

    The warm water creates a strong temperature gradient from its surface to the atmosphere just above it.

  • NWS shares video of bombogenesis

    The NWS’s Weather Prediction Center shared a clip of a video surface map, which analyzed the progress of the winter storm.

    A steep drop in air pressure, 35 millibars, is consistent with conditions for a so-called “bomb cyclone.”

  • Footage from Montauk shows heavy snowfall

    One reporter from The Weather Channel shared footage from Montauk, where heavy snow fell Saturday.

    Montauk also experienced severe winds, with gusts reaching speeds of 45 miles per hour.

  • College student found dead in New York

    A college student died after being found outside a bus garage exposed to subzero temperatures, authorities said.

    Tyler Lopresti-Castro was found near the Silas Lane Bus Garage by two city employees, according to the Oneonta Police Department.

    Video footage from the garage shows the 20-year-old emerging from a wooded area behind the garage around 2:15am.

    “A search of the surrounding area indicates Tyler may have walked off the roadway… climbing through the snow and crossing a drainage creek before emerging on Oneonta City property,” said Police.

    The SUNY Oneonta college student was “suffering from extended exposure to extremely cold, subzero temperatures,” said police. 

    He was taken to the hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. 

  • Massachusetts man dies in snowmobile accident

    A Massachusetts man died Friday after he crashed his snowmobile into a tree in Pittsburgh.

    New Hampshire Fish and Game identified the man as Derric Harper from Mansfield.

    Harper is said to have been riding the snowmobile on the Corridor Trail 20 when he lost control and hit a tree, authorities said.

    He was thrown from the machine and suffered “significant injuries”.

    Another snowmobiler was riding with Harper who realized he was not with him and turned around, investigators said.

    A witness who came across the crash assisted Harper and called 911.

    The Pittsburg Police and Fire Departments and Conservation Officers responded to the scene, according to WMUR.

    Harper was rushed to the hospital but was later pronounced dead.

    Fish and Game officials say the crash is under investigation but added that Harper’s “inexperience” may have been a primary factor in the crash.

  • Massachusetts sees heavy snowfall Saturday

    Massachusetts saw three to four inches of snow fall per hour during the day Saturday, according to the National Weather Service.

    A tweet from the regional office in Boston said: “Radar estimates beginning to show some isolated areas of 3-4 inch per hour snowfall rates (assuming 10:1 snow to liquid radio) over southeastern MA.”

  • What are considered ‘blizzard conditions’?

    Not every storm is considered to be a blizzard.

    There are three conditions that must be met for a storm to be considered a blizzard.

    Snow must combine with winds over 35 miles per hour.

    On top of that, visibility must be less than a quarter mile.

    These conditions must last for more than three hours.

  • Winter storm is a nor’easter

    A nor’easter is a storm that forms along North America’s East Coast. Nor’easters get their name from the direction in which the strongest winds blow over the northeastern states, including New England and the Mid-Atlantic.

    Nor’easters begin to form within 100 miles of the coast that stretches between New Jersey and Georgia.

    This area is a perfect spot for the formation of storms. The polar jet stream blows cold air southward out of Canada and eastward toward the ocean. 

  • Weather considered ‘serious’ threat

    AccuWeather Chief On-Air Meteorologist Bernie Rayno said: “The area that we think will be hit the hardest and will be at risk for closures will be central and eastern Long Island to New England.”

    His colleague Jonathan Porter added: “This is going to be an intensifying storm that will produce a lot of wind, which raises concerns for blowing and drifting snow, power outages and blizzard conditions in some areas.

    “There is also a serious coastal flooding and beach erosion threat, especially in eastern Massachusetts.”

  • ‘Historic’ storm for New England

    Eastern New England is expected to see the worst of the blizzard conditions brought in by Storm Kenan.

    The National Weather Service said Friday evening there was “high confidence” this will be a “historic major winter storm for eastern New England,” with widespread snowfall of one to two feet.

    It also warned: “The strong-to-damaging winds will lead to scattered power outages.”

    The Weather Prediction Center also warned of the possibility of coastal flooding.

    “Coastal flooding is a concern thanks to astronomically high tides on Saturday,” the weather service office in Boston said. “The combination of strong northeast winds and high seas will bring storm surges that, if coinciding with high tide, would lead to minor or moderate coastal flooding.”

  • Another winter storm is brewing

    Another winter storm is already brewing and is expected to hit central parts of the US around the middle of next week, the NWS has warned.

    With the current storm still battering the eastern states, it looks like more Americans will suffer further significant snow, sleet, and freezing rain.

    While the NWS said it was too early to give accurate information it added “a large, impactful and potentially significant is possible from the southern Plains through the lower Great Lakes”.

  • Rhode Island extends travel ban

    Gov. Daniel McKee has announced in a press briefing that he had extended a travel ban on motor vehicles until midnight to allow snow plows to clean and clear roads and highways.

    Rhode Island, all of which was under a blizzard warning, banned all non-emergency road travel earlier due to the severe weather conditions.

  • Boston could see snowfall record smashed

    Boston could see its snowfall record broken during this weekend’s winter weather storm which is continuing.

    The Boston area’s modern snowfall record is 27.6 inches, set in 2003.

    Forecasters are predicting the area could see more than 2 feet (61 centimeters) of snow by the time it moves out early Sunday.

    Winds gusted as high as 83 mph (134 kph) on Cape Cod in Massachusetts. More than 22 inches (45 centimeters) of snow had fallen by midafternoon on part of Long Island, and Bayville, New Jersey, had 19 inches (48 centimeters).

    New York City and Philadelphia were far from setting all-time records but still saw significant snowfall, with at least 7.5 inches (19 centimeters) in New York’s Central Park and at the Philadelphia airport.

  • ‘Avoid travel’ locals told

    Across the region, residents hunkered down and avoided travel at the behest of government leaders, who warned of whiteout conditions.

    Business closed or opened late.

    Officials from Virginia to Maine warned people to stay off the roads.

    Rhode Island, all of which was under a blizzard warning, banned all nonemergency road travel starting at 8am. Fierce winds blew the snow sideways for hours in Providence.

    On New York’s Long Island, East Hampton officials reported near-whiteout conditions, as much as 8 inches (20 centimeters) of snow by midmorning and wind gusts of over 50 mph (80 kph).

    “There’s a lot of drifting of snow, so of course we’re urging people not to go out at all, allow the highway crews to do their job,” Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc said. “It’s going to be challenging enough without people getting stuck in the roadway.”

  • Blizzard to continue

    The fierce blizzard conditions are expected to last into this afternoon, the National Weather Service has warned.

    The NWS said on Twitter: “Heavy snow and blizzard conditions will continue through this afternoon from eastern Long Island to eastern MA, including eastern RI and CT.

    “The heaviest snow rates will likely diminish by 4-5pm ET.

    “Strong wind gusts of 35-50 kts are possible into this evening.”

  • What happens during a cyclone?

    It occurs when a midlatitude cyclone rapidly intensifies, dropping at least 24 millibars — A millibar measures atmospheric pressure — over 24 hours.

    This can happen when a cold air mass collides with a warm air mass.

    An example is when chilly air moves over warm ocean waters.

    The formation of this rapidly strengthening weather system is a process called bombogenesis, which creates what is known as a bomb cyclone.

  • What are blizzard conditions?

    Not every storm is considered to be a blizzard.

    There are three conditions that must be met for a storm to be considered a blizzard.

    Snow must combine with winds over 35 miles per hour.

    On top of that, visibility must be less than a quarter mile.

    These conditions must last for more than three hours.

  • What is a nor’easter?

    A nor’easter is a storm that forms along North America’s East Coast. Nor’easters get their name from the direction in which the strongest winds blow over the northeastern states, including New England and the Mid-Atlantic.

    Nor’easters begin to form within 100 miles of the coast that stretches between New Jersey and Georgia.

    This area is a perfect spot for the formation of storms. The polar jet stream blows cold air southward out of Canada and eastward toward the ocean. 

  • Snowfall – the latest figures

    A number of eastern states have suffered significant amounts of snow this morning, official figures from the National Weather Service show.

    The NWS has reported as of 11am Saturday:

    Highest totals by state so far:

    • NJ – Tuckerton 16″
    • NY – Islip 15″
    • CT – Ledyard Center 14.1″
    • MD – Ocean Pines 14″
    • DE – Millsboro – 13″
    • TN – Mt. Leconte 12″
    • NC – Burnsville 9.7″
    • VA – Oak Hill 9.5″
    • MA – Norton 8.1″
    • PA – Fox Chase 6.1″
    The NWS issued snowfall figures across the eastern states
    The NWS issued snowfall figures across the eastern states
  • Near hurricane-force winds

    Wind gusts reached near hurricane-force speeds as the winter weather storm lashed the Northeast on Saturday, dropping heavy snow, causing coastal flooding and threatening widespread power outages.

    Forecasters warned conditions would worsen and then be followed by bitter cold.

    The nor’easter thrashed parts of 10 states and some major population centers, including Philadelphia, New York and Boston. By midday, more than 18 inches (45 centimeters) of snow had fallen on parts of New Jerseys shore and eastern Long Island.

    Areas closest to the Atlantic coast bore the brunt. Boston, in the nor’easter’s crosshairs, could get more than 2 feet (61 centimeters) of snow. Winds gusted at 70 mph (113 kph) or higher at several spots in Massachusetts, including Nantucket Island and Provincetown, at the tip of Cape Cod.

    Most flights into and out of the airports serving New York, Boston and Philadelphia were canceled Saturday, according to FlightAware.

    More than 4,500 flights were canceled across the U.S. Amtrak canceled all its high-speed Acela trains between Boston and Washington and canceled or limited other service.

  • Motorists stuck in snow

    Police on Long Island said they had to help motorists stuck in the snow.

    New York City expected up to a foot (30 centimeters) of snow by mid-afternoon.

    In Philadelphia, where 6 inches (15 centimeters) fell by early Saturday, few drivers ventured onto streets covered in knee-high drifts.

    Delaware allowed only essential personnel to drive in two of its three counties.

    Virginia, where a blizzard this month stranded hundreds of motorists for hours on Interstate 95, did not hesitate to get resources at the ready.

    Ocean City, Maryland, recorded at least a foot (30 centimeters) of snow. Maryland State Police tweeted that troopers had received more than 670 calls for service and responded to over 90 crashes by midmorning.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/17463851/winter-storm-kenan-travel-flights-snow-live-blizzard/ Winter Storm Kenan path tracker LIVE – Travel disruption as 4,500 flights canceled after more than 24 inches of snow

Bobby Allyn

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