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Will Roe v. Wade upside down?

In May, the Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments from the Mississippi case, Dobbs v. Jackson’s Women’s Health Foundation, in an effort to ban abortions after 15 weeks. The decision comes at the same time Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed into law the country’s most stringent abortion ban, known as Senate Bill-8. The law forbids women from having the procedure after six weeks of pregnancy or when the heart is found to be active. In a decision of five to four, the Supreme Court refused to block Texas’ injunction, effectively changing the precedent of Roe v. Wade’s landmark 1973 decision to make abortion a right. constitution. The law forced many clinics to close and encouraged individuals to enforce the ban by offering a $10,000 bounty to anyone who helped women get an abortion. Following the Supreme Court decision, the Justice Department filed a lawsuit against the state of Texas to protect women’s constitutional rights. Additionally, in early October, a federal judge ordered the law to be blocked, but Abbott immediately appealed the decision. On November 1, the Supreme Court began hearing arguments in two cases about whether abortion providers or the Department of Justice could bring federal court challenges to with the law or not, which has an unusual enforcement plan that defenders argue shields it from federal court review. Neither case examines the constitutionality of the law directly, but the motive is that Texas’ ban contradicts landmark Supreme Court rulings that prevented a state from banning early abortion in the United States. Pregnancy period. Similarly, Mississippi’s only abortion clinic is in jeopardy. In the South and Midwest, where abortion is inherently difficult to access, if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, it would eliminate the procedure altogether. In this episode of Clarified, learn how Roe and Wade’s 48-year precedent is being challenged. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

In May, the Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments from the Mississippi case, Dobbs v. Jackson’s Women’s Health Foundation, in an effort to ban abortions after 15 weeks.

The decision comes at the same time Texas Governor Greg Abbott signed into law the country’s most stringent abortion ban, known as Senate Bill-8. The law forbids women from having the procedure after six weeks of pregnancy or when the heart is found to be active.

In a decision of five to four, the Supreme Court refused to block Texas’ injunction, effectively changing the precedent of Roe v. Wade’s landmark 1973 decision to make abortion a right. constitution. The law forced many clinics to close and encouraged individuals to enforce the ban by offering a $10,000 bounty to anyone who helped women get an abortion.

Following the Supreme Court decision, the Justice Department filed a lawsuit against the state of Texas to protect women’s constitutional rights.

Additionally, in early October, a federal judge ordered the law to be blocked, but Abbott immediately appealed the decision.

On November 1, the Supreme Court began hearing arguments in two cases about whether abortion providers or the Department of Justice could bring federal court challenges to with the law or not, which has an unusual enforcement plan that defenders argue shields it from federal court review.

Neither case examines the constitutionality of the law directly, but the motive is that Texas’ ban contradicts landmark Supreme Court rulings that prevented a state from banning early abortion in the United States. Pregnancy period.

Similarly, Mississippi’s only abortion clinic is in jeopardy. In the South and Midwest, where abortion is inherently difficult to access, if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, it would eliminate the procedure altogether.

In this Clarified episode, learn about the 48-year precedent of Roe v. Wade is being challenged.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

https://www.kcra.com/article/will-roe-v-wade-be-overturned/37912988 Will Roe v. Wade upside down?

JOE HERNANDEZ

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