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The most valuable bug coins include pieces of Washington and Lincoln

YOUR spare change can be quite valuable if you happen to be holding the right piece – including faulty coins.

In particular, coin errors occur when the mint does not exactly one product.

These coins have all been put into circulation

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These coins have all been put into circulation

Some common errors include dead error, wrong plan, and eccentricity error.

Some people may be surprised to discover that these errors can be found on coins featuring the usual US Presidents.

This includes your Lincoln, Jefferson and Washington area coins.

Importantly, buggy coins can be quite valuable and some sell for hundreds or even thousands of dollars in auctions.

To see if your money is worth anything, you can check eBay by searching for the full name, selecting the “sold” listing, then turning the search to “highest value.”

We break down the most valuable bug coins, all of which are in circulation – meaning they have been released to the public.

1922 Lincoln penny – 2,910 USD

All 1922 Lincoln coins should have a D but this one doesn't

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All 1922 Lincoln coins should have a D but this one doesn’t

Starting with the Lincoln coin, some dating from 1922 can be quite valuable.

What’s most interesting is that not a single Lincoln cent that year was minted outside of Denver – meaning they all had to be marked with a “D”.

However, some do not contain the mark because there is “negligence in the manufacturing process”, said Mr Hernadez of Professional Coin Grading Service Written.

“As a result, it is believed that a mint employee obtained an old mold and submitted it to improve its appearance.

“But instead, the mint staff marked D too much, and in return, created Lincoln No D coins in 1922.”

Until 2017, a coin minted in the United States had never displayed the letter “P”.

So if you’ve never seen one, you might mistake the unmarked 1922 piece for a coin minted in Philadelphia – but it’s not.

One without 1922 cents with no silver accents recently sold for almost $3,000 online.

1955 Lincoln penny – $2,355

There are doubles of dates and words "Liberty" and "We believe in God"

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There is a double increase in the date and the words “Liberty” and “In God We Trust”

Another notable Lincoln lapse was the 1955 double-dialed counter.

For those unfamiliar with this error, it means that there is a copy of the letters, numbers or words on the coin.

For example, on this coin you can clearly see “We Trust in God”, “Freedom” and “In 1955” all double on the obverse on the coin.

“The 1955 double dies were created when the Mint struck a working center and a die working together while both were rotated slightly differently,” said Jamie Hernandez of Professional Coin Grading Service Written in a description of the coin.

This, of course, created a double die effect – which was mixed in with the millions of normal attack versions of the coin.

One PCGS-certified at “AU 58” sold for over $2,300 on eBay recently.

Based on United States Coin Book, 1955 double dead coin worth $1,318 per medium and up to $17,057 if in the “non-circulating (MS-63)” condition.

Quarter of 2020 in Washington – $305

This quarter in Washington features damage to the right of the head bat

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This quarter in Washington features damage to the right of the head bat

In 2020, the U.S. mint launched its first quarterly bat coin in Washington.

In fact, the coin actually has two bats on the reverse, depicted as a fruit bat eating its mother and baby.

Although this is the first time with a bat design, it is thought that 286 million of these coins have been minted with the “P” mark on the back.

However, one with the mother’s damaged left eye sold on eBay for $305 in December.

This is described as a blind bat bug.

1802 Draped Bust Large Cent – $218.25

This worn bust coin has the word “1” with three zeros on the back

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This worn bust coin has the word “1” with three zeros on the back

Long before the Lincoln coin, large coin busts covered with people appeared all around.

Mined between 1796 and 1807, just over 16 million coins wearing the bust are thought to have been made.

When it comes to 1802 coins, it is said to contain the numbers “1/100” on the bottom side of the obverse.

However, there is one that has the number “1” with three zeros.

One with this defect was recently sold for $218.25 online.

Quarter 2000 in Washington – $215.50

New Hampshire neighborhood attacked with Jefferson nickel

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New Hampshire neighborhood attacked with Jefferson nickel

Some of you may be familiar with coins from the Washington State quarterly series, minted between 1999 and 2008.

Each state neighborhood has its own unique design, which can be found on the back.

But there are also error coins in this series.

In fact, one sold for $215.50 on eBay this month.

The seller of this coin claimed that the quarter’s coin was struck on the Jefferson coin with a planned minting error.

“Planchet errors include all errors arising from a faulty blank, whether or not it has been passed through the factory,” coin service website Fleur de Coin Written.

The most common planchet error occurs when the “wrong planchet” is passed through a coining press.

Furthermore, sometimes the shavings, when passed through the machine, contain molds of different denominations.

The Planchet error is also known as the double face value.

The reverse side of the coin shows the words “Old Man of the Mountain” with the year 1788, which means neighborhood of the state of New Hampshire.

For more on coins, we recently explained the Henning Jefferson coin and why it’s worth over $400.

Plus, we show you how to find rare coins, including those featuring Lincoln.

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https://www.the-sun.com/money/4748071/rare-error-coins-lincoln-washington/ The most valuable bug coins include pieces of Washington and Lincoln

Caroline Bleakley

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