Local

Sacramento officials, groups that help the homeless community

The discovery of a homeless camp dealing with a language barrier prompted Sacramento city officials to come to the aid. This has prompted a number of organizations and city council members including Mai Vang District 8 and Rick Jennings District 7 to implement a hands-on approach to helping the community. At least a dozen people have been placed in short-term shelters through the city’s motel voucher program. Among other groups that have come to help is Sacramento Steps Forward, a nonprofit dedicated to helping people escape homelessness. “It is surprising to see that they are living in such impoverished conditions. However, they have made the best of what they have with the resources. There are several gardens,” said Theresa Bible, a navigator. Reached to Sacramento Steps Forward said. According to the Interagency Council on Homelessness in California, California’s homelessness crisis has left about 161,548 residents homeless. and the Morrison Creek plantation – an estimated 30+ Southeast Asian community members reside on that plantation, and it was very important to me and my staff to make sure we had the right resources. resources to get to that plantation as soon as possible,” Vang said After the Bible visited the camp, she noted the language and cultural barriers that made the Hmong community particularly vulnerable to risks. experiencing homelessness The age groups are different, but the younger members of the prison can speak English and interpret for the older generation Vang explains that it is essential to help the youths. families at risk of becoming self-sufficient, Vang says: “How do people end up homeless? A big part is because they live in poverty or they live on a paycheck.” “So this affects everyone and so when people say, ‘I’m shocked that there are people who don’t. allowed to be Hmong,” I’ll tell people, it’s heartbreaking.” On the southwestern edge of the city limits, is another homeless camp that is largely comprised of people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Other organizations are assisting these people with services in other languages ​​to meet the needs of diverse communities.

The discovery of a homeless camp dealing with a language barrier prompted Sacramento city officials to assist them.

Along Morrison Creek south of Sacramento is a predominantly Laotian, Cambodian and Vietnamese community. Most of them cannot speak English.

This has prompted a number of organizations and city council members including District 8’s Golden Plum and District 7’s Rick Jennings to launch a hands-on approach to helping the community. At least a dozen people have been placed in short-term shelters through the city’s motel voucher program.

According to the city, motel offers are typically valid for seven days, and each case is reevaluated for a short-term resolution.

One of the other groups that came to help was Sacramento Steps Forward, a nonprofit dedicated to helping people escape homelessness.

“It’s amazing to see that they’re living in such poverty. However, they’ve made the most of their resources. There are some gardens,” continued Theresa Bible, a navigator. approached Sacramento Steps Forward, said.

The homelessness crisis in California has left about 161,548 residents are not crowded, according to the Interagency Council on Homelessness.

According to the last Sacramento County census, more than 7,700 homeless people from January 1 to June 30, 2021.

“Homelessness knows no boundaries and language and Morrison Creek garrison – an estimated 30+ Southeast Asian community members reside in that camp and that’s very important to me and My staff is making sure we get resources to that area as soon as possible,” Vang said.

After Bible visited the camp, she noted the language and cultural barriers that make the Hmong community particularly vulnerable to the risk of homelessness. The age groups vary, but the younger members of the camp can speak English and interpret for the older generation.

Sacramento Steps Forward was first contacted by law enforcement when the detention facility was discovered, and while Bible says she was surprised when contacted, Vang explained that it was essential to help the families. Families are at risk of becoming self-sufficient.

“How do people end up homeless? It’s largely because they live in poverty or they live on a paycheck,” says Vang. “So this affects everyone and so when people say ‘I’m shocked that there are people who aren’t allowed to be Hmong,’ I’ll tell everyone, it’s heartbreaking. “

In the area of ​​Sacramento’s Pocket, an area west of Interstate 5 that forms the southwestern edge of the city limits, there is another homeless camp that is largely comprised of people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Other organizations are supporting those residents.

Councilmember Mai Vang told KCRA 3 that she has requested an internal review of how the city of Sacramento is delivering language services and is promoting a language access policy to ensure that the city has can provide resources, information, and services in other languages ​​to meet the needs of diverse communities.

https://www.kcra.com/article/sacramento-help-house-homeless-community-language-barriers/38444935 Sacramento officials, groups that help the homeless community

JOE HERNANDEZ

USTimeToday is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@ustimetoday.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button