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Sacramento Nominates Kathy Lester As City’s First Female Sheriff

Kathy Lester, a 27-year veteran of the Sacramento Police Department, will become the city’s first female sheriff. City leaders announced Friday that Lester has been promoted to succeed Sheriff Daniel Hahn after he retires later this year as head of a division with more than 1,100 civilian employees. oath and oath. Hahn was Sacramento’s first Black sheriff. “Kathy Lester is more than just a homegrown talent and a historic date; She is the 100% right person to lead this department at this time, embodying an unparalleled breadth of experience and values ​​that are important to our community,” Mayor Darrell Steinberg said in a statement. An announcement. “I know she will excel in this position and continue the high standards set by Sheriff Hahn.” Lester started with the dispatching department in 1994 and became a sworn officer two years later. Since then, she has risen through the ranks and is a leader in the contracts, human resources, outreach, and police services departments for the Sacramento City Unified School District. Lester’s family has lived in Sacramento for “several generations,” according to the statement. She graduated from Sacramento State University after studying government and international relations and earned a master’s degree in geosciences from Mississippi State University. She went on to serve in the Army as a military interpreter after becoming fluent in Russian and also as a combat medic and master of range. “I am humbled by this appointment and the opportunity to serve our residents in this role,” Lester said in the statement. “I joined the Sacramento Police Department because of its reputation for community-based policing, and that spirit of community and collaboration has long been ingrained in me. I look forward to the Sacramento Police Department continuing the ongoing work to make our city a place where everyone feels safe, secure, and protected. ” established a full-time mental health team and implemented gender awareness training for all officers. The city said in its release that Lester was appointed following a national recruitment process and a recruitment process that took into account 1,700 responses to a community survey of qualities that should be considered for the police. The next chief of the city. a time when statistics show a 17% increase in assaults and a 30% increase in homicides in the first half of the year. The department said on Friday that it was in the process of releasing more recent statistics through August. Meanwhile, bias-related incidents reported to the department have spiked. There were 126 incidents reported as of the end of September, compared with 57 incidents for all of 2020, according to the department’s website. “At this time, the department has not identified a specific reason for the increase in incidents of prejudice,” the ministry said. In 2019, a community survey found that 46% of Sacramento adults rated the city’s police services as very good or good, even though white residents were likely to give it a positive rating. three times higher than the other groups. And more than 80% of white and Asian residents who responded said they have some or all confidence in the police, but that percentage drops to 69% for Hispanic respondents and 53% for respondents. with black people. how they must trust residents in the area they serve, about 71% of respondents said they have “fairly little” or “somewhat” trust. Surveys also show that nearly 40% of Sacramento residents say they do not believe all races are treated equally. But 88% of police polled said they strongly believe that officers treat everyone equally.

Kathy Lester, a 27-year veteran of the Sacramento Police Department, will become the city’s first female sheriff.

City leaders on Friday announced that Lester has been promoted to succeed Sheriff Daniel Hahn after following he retires at the end of the year as chief of staff with more than 1,100 sworn and civilian officers. Hahn was Sacramento’s first Black sheriff.

“Kathy Lester is more than just a homegrown talent and a historic date; She is the 100% right person to lead this department at this time, embodying an unparalleled breadth of experience and values ​​that are important to our community,” Mayor Darrell Steinberg said in a statement. An announcement. “I know she will excel in this position and continue the high standards set by Sheriff Hahn.”

Lester started with the dispatching department in 1994 and became a sworn officer two years later.

Since then, she has risen through the ranks and is a leader in the contracts, human resources, outreach, and police services departments for the Sacramento City Unified School District.

Lester’s family has lived in Sacramento for “several generations,” according to the statement. She graduated from Sacramento State University after studying government and international relations and earned a master’s degree in geosciences from Mississippi State University.

She went on to serve in the Army as a military interpreter after becoming fluent in Russian and also as a combat medic and master of range.

“I am humbled by this appointment and the opportunity to serve our residents in this role,” Lester said in the statement. “I joined the Sacramento Police Department because of its reputation for community-based policing, and that spirit of community and collaboration has long been ingrained in me. I look forward to seeing the Sacramento Police Department continue the ongoing work to make our city a place where everyone feels safe, secure, and protected.”

Among Lester’s accomplishments, according to the city, are that she established a pipeline recruiting program to increase diversity, started a full-time mental health team, and conducted recognition training. gender awareness for all officers.

The city said in its release that Lester was appointed following a national recruitment process and a recruitment process that took into account 1,700 responses to a community survey of qualities that should be considered for the police. The next chief of the city.

Lester was in charge of the department at a time when statistics showed a 17% increase in assaults and a 30% increase in homicides. in the first half of the year. The department said on Friday that it was in the process of releasing more recent statistics through August.

Meanwhile, bias-related incidents reported to the department have spiked. There have been 126 incidents reported until the end of September, compared to 57 cho all 2020, according to the department’s website.

“At this time, the department has not yet identified a specific reason for the increase in bias-related incidents,” the department said.

Surveys also revealed issues of trust between certain sections of the community and officials serving Sacramento.

In 2019, a community survey found that 46% of Sacramento adults rate the city’s police services as very good or good, even though white residents are three times more likely to give a positive rating than other groups.

And more than 80% of white and Asian residents who responded said they have some or all confidence in the police, but that percentage drops to 69% for Hispanic respondents and 53% for black people.

When police officers were asked in a officer survey how they must trust residents in the area they serve, about 71% of respondents said they have “fairly little” or “somewhat” trust.

Surveys also show that nearly 40% of Sacramento residents say they do not believe all races are treated equally. But 88% of the police asked said they strongly believe that officers treat everyone equally.

https://www.kcra.com/article/sacramento-promotes-kathy-lester-as-citys-first-woman-police-chief/38487235 Sacramento Nominates Kathy Lester As City’s First Female Sheriff

JOE HERNANDEZ

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