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Memorable moments in Bob Dole’s life and political career | WJMN

WASHINGTON (AP) – Bob Dole’s political career began in 1950 with his election to the Kansas Legislature and officially ended nearly five decades later, just one step away from the White House. When he retired, Dole continued to work at the age of 90 for the goals he cherished.

Looking back at some moments from life in politics:

As a college student, Dole planned to become a doctor. The Second World War changed the direction of his life. He nearly died of his injuries as a second lieutenant commanding an attack on German forces. After three years of surgery and physical therapy, Dole regained the ability to dress, eat, and walk. But he never used his right hand and arm, and most of his left hand was numb. Dole returned to college, earned a law degree, and was elected district attorney. “In theory, if I couldn’t use my hands, I could use my head,” he later recalled.

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Dole was a senator who was known for his bitter remarks when President Gerald Ford chose him as his running mate. Dole shocked viewers of the 1976 vice-president debate by declaring the wars of the 20th century to date – the two world wars, Korea and Vietnam – as “war of the Democrats” killed or injured 1.6 million Americans. “Senator Dole was very popular as a man tonight,” replied his Democratic opponent, Senator Walter Mondale of Minnesota.

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Dole has recovered from losing tickets to Jimmy Carter and Mondale. He lessens his prongs, directing more people towards him. He analyzed the 1976 presidential campaign this way: “President Ford was supposed to take the highway, and I was supposed to take the long haul. And I did – my own. ”

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During his nearly 36 years in Congress, Dole was known as a staunch deal-maker, trusted to forge bipartisan compromises. “You have to make tough choices,” says Dole. It’s not for him to “vote no against all the hard things and vote yes on all the easy things, and you go out and give a speech about how hard you are.”

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In May 1996, Senate Majority Leader Dole surprised his colleagues by announcing that he was stepping down to devote himself fully to his presidential campaign. “I will seek the presidency with nothing to disappoint but the judgment of the people,” he said, “and go nowhere but the White House or the home.”

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As a 73-year-old presidential candidate, Dole faces questions about her age. It didn’t help when he fell on a campaign stage in Chico, California, landing on the ground. Dole tried to shift the focus to questions about the personal character of his opponent, President Bill Clinton. “If something happens along the way and you have to leave your kids with Bob Dole or Bill Clinton,” Dole told voters, “I think you might leave them with Bob Dole.” The poll on the question suggested that parents feel differently.

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Hoping to revive his presidential campaign, Dole ran a last 96-hour round-the-clock marathon until Election Day 1996. When a reporter asked if Dole had brought enough clean clothes, he quips, “We’ll stop at a lingerie factory. ”

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Dole chose comedian David Letterman’s show for his first post-election appearance. He displays a sharp intelligence that remains largely hidden throughout the campaign. Invited to enjoy a dish about Clinton’s weight, Dole countered: “I never tried to lift him up. I was just trying to beat him.” When asked if he would consider accepting a position in the Clinton administration, Dole said, “Well, if he wants to give me his job, I’ll think about it.”

Dole later wrote: “I suppose you could say that my post-political career really began that Friday night when viewers discovered that I wasn’t a lust-go-so-soul eater. society”.

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Dole was the driving force behind the construction of the World War II Memorial on the National Mall. He spoke poignantly about its 2004 dedication to tens of thousands of veterans in their 80s and 90s about the “physical and moral courage that make up the heroes of the farm.” and city boys.

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In 2012, looking sick and confined to a wheelchair, Dole returned to the Senate to demonstrate in support of the passage of the United Nations treaty on the rights of people with disabilities, modeled on the Persons with Disabilities Act. landmark that he passed in the Senate. The treaty, opposed by most Republican senators, failed despite his personal appeal.

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Two weeks later, Dole returned to the Senate as mourners walked past the coffin of Senator Daniel Inouye, D-Hawaii, with whom Dole had befriended decades before the men convaled after the war. . Standing up from his wheelchair and walking with assistance, Dole saluted Inouye’s coffin. He explained to a reporter for Attendance that he “didn’t want Danny to see me in the wheelchair.”

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In 2014, at the age of 90, Dole began a series of emotional tours of her hometown, at a campaign-style pace of three or four stops a day. Dole, who lives in Washington, said he wanted to thank those back home who have supported them over the decades. Kansasians lined up at libraries, courts and senior centers to shake his hand and share memories of his visit to all 105 counties.

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“I am proof that it is never too late to join Twitter,” Dole, 92, tweeted from her new social media account in June 2016. Dole used the platform to point out. quotes Representative Tim Huelskamp of Kansas, a conservative Republican who has been a major challenger from a candidate campaigning as a pragmatist, Roger Marshall. In August, Marshall won the primaries and won a seat in the House, before winning the Senate seat four years later, also with Dole’s approval.

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In 2016, Dole initially supported former Florida Governor Jeb Bush for the GOP presidential nomination. He later warmed to Donald Trump, but not Texas Senator Ted Cruz, telling The New York Times in January of that year that Cruz was an “extremist” whose nomination would cost The GOP was “catastrophic,” adding, “Nobody liked him. Then he officially endorsed Trump.

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In September 2018, then-President Trump signed legislation awarding Dole the Congressional Gold Medal, one of the highest civilian honors awarded in the United States, in recognition of service in the United States. Dole’s military and long political career. In many ways, Dole embodies the Kansas state motto: “Ad astra per aspera” – towards the stars overcoming adversity.

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Another Dole moment in the public eye was an emotional one: On December 4, 2018, Dole made an emotional appearance before the coffin of another World War II veteran, former President George HW. Bush, at the United States Capitol Rotunda. As an aide lifted Dole out of his wheelchair, the ailing Dole gradually stabilized himself and saluted Bush with his left hand, his chin trembling. Witnessed by many, it was a moving tribute to his one-time political rival

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Six weeks after the November 2020 election, when Trump still refused to give in to Democrat Joe Biden and promote baseless claims of voter fraud, Dole told The Kansas City Star, “The the election is over.” He said of Trump: “It’s been quite a bitter pill for Trump, but it’s the truth that he lost.

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Dole announced on February 18, 2021, that he has been diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and that he will begin treatment within the next few days. Social media continues to spread sympathy, prayers and well-wishes from across the political spectrum. “While I’m sure there are some obstacles ahead, I also know that I join the millions of Americans who are facing significant health challenges of their own,” Dole said.

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Hanna reports from Topeka, Kansas. Former Associated Press writer Connie Cass contributed to this report.

https://www.upmatters.com/news/memorable-moments-from-bob-doles-life-and-political-career/ Memorable moments in Bob Dole’s life and political career | WJMN

Emma Bowman

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