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Izzy 2022 Blizzard Live Update – Snow total revealed on map as winter storm hits New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio

A HUGE winter storm has dropped a layer or more of snow in several northern states, after making landfall in the Southeast over the weekend.

Hundreds of flights were canceled and tens of thousands of northeast residents lost power.

The northeast corner of Ohio recorded 25 inches of snow, and forecasters in Buffalo, New York, recorded 18 inches as of 1 p.m. Monday.

The southeast was hit hard by the storm over the weekend, with nearly 200,000 power outages reported.

The storm, named Izzy by The Weather Channel, hit the East Coast with intense ice, snow, wind and rain.

As of Sunday night, 260,000 power outages were reported, 3,000 flights were canceled and 5 states declared a state of emergency.

The storm, which will end after a period in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, passed on Monday.

Heavy snow is forecast in the Northeast up to 18 inches late Monday.

Read our Izzy blizzard live blog for the latest news and updates…

  • What is winter weather advice?

    A winter weather advisory is an indication of possible winter weather conditions.

    However, the expected conditions are not severe enough to warrant a warning.

  • Power outages across 10 states

    Thousands of people have no power from Georgia to New York on Monday morning, according to poweroutage.us.

    Around 9 a.m. on Monday, the top blackouts included more than 30,000 in both North and South Carolina; about 24,000 each in West Virginia and Georgia; more than 18,000 in Pennsylvania; about 14,000 in Kentucky and Virginia; and 11,000 in New York, according to the Weather Channel.

  • Keep the faucet transparent when it snows

    Ahead of blizzards in the northeast, a Rochester, NY fire department shared tips for keeping fire hydrants clear in the winter.

    Remove snow and ice from the faucet, and clear a belt around the faucet.

    A three-foot circumference gives firefighters enough room to work.

    Clear a path from the gully to the street.

  • NYC recommend staying in

    New York City First Deputy Commissioner for Emergency Management Christina Farrell said New Yorkers should prepare for slippery roads and the possibility of flooding.

    The city’s anti-falling task force has been activated.

    “We urge New Yorkers to exercise caution,” Farrell said in a press release.

    “If you must travel, we recommend using public transport and please allow extra travel time.”

  • 2 dead in crash in South Carolina

    In a deadly crash on Interstate 95 in South Carolina, two North Carolinis were killed.

    Woman and man, from Myrtle Beach, both died at the scene, the official said.

    Soldiers said that at the time of the crash at 9:20 a.m., there was a “mixed winter rain” falling so it was difficult to see.

    “Initial investigation shows that a blue Honda CRV veered to the left and hit some trees in the median,” a statement from the soldiers said.

  • From 6 to 12 inches of snow

    Anywhere 6 to 12 inches of snow is expected to cover from the eastern Dakotas to western Minnesota and Iowa, AccuWeather speak.

    Minneapolis, Des Moines, St. Louis and Kansas City are both in the path of the storm.

    Early Saturday, tough driving conditions are expected throughout the area.

  • Izzy brings good business

    One benefit of Winter Storm Izzy could be that business is booming for snow removal companies around the country.

    In central Ohio, it’s snowing bring out some plows and salt on the roads for the first time this winter.

    “This is the first time we’ve actually dropped a plow all season and it’s just all hands on deck,” Jacob Wood with Ohio’s Lumberland Service told NBC.

  • ‘Stay safe on the road’

    ONE weather enthusiast on Twitter shared tips for staying safe on the road for anyone planning to drive during winter storm Izzy.

    “If someone is going to be driving in Winter Storm #Izzy, here are some tips to stay safe on the road,” the account shared.

    “Make sure you bring a blanket and some flashlights just in case you get stuck. Also, remember to drive slowly and be careful on the road. Keep safe!”

  • Winter storm name

    These are naming Selected Weather Channel for winter storms in the 2021-2022 season:

    • Atticus
    • Bankston
    • Carrie
    • Delphine
    • Elmer
    • Frida
    • Garrett
    • Hatcher
    • Izzy
    • Jasper
    • Kenan
    • Landon
    • Mile
    • Nancy
    • Oaklee
    • Phyllis
    • Quinlan
    • Rachel
    • Silas
    • Tad
    • Usher
    • Female Star
    • Willow
    • Xandy
    • Yeager
    • Zion
  • Choose a name

    The Weather Channel chooses names for snowstorms and explains the process website.

    “Names will be used in alphabetical order to identify winter storms that meet objective naming criteria based on the agency’s winter storm warnings, blizzard warnings, and ice storm warnings. National Weather Service,” the agency noted.

  • Who named the blizzards?

    The Weather channel names of blizzards.

    The newspaper notes that the 2021-22 season is the 10th season The Weather Channel will name the winter storms.

  • Safety tips, continue

    There is a battery store.

    If you lose power, know how to report the outage to your utility company.

    Keep pets in a warm place with food and water.

  • Safety tips

    The South Carolina Department of Emergency Management shared some safe driving tips and winter storm advice before Izzy arrives:

    Avoid unnecessary travel in affected areas.

    If you must travel, make sure your vehicle is working properly, your cell phone is fully charged, and pack extra blankets and snacks in case of delays.

  • Does North Carolina have an emergency order?

    North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper signed an emergency order and the administration urged people to stay home through the weekend.

    The state highway agency warned that labor shortages mean crews may not be able to respond to problem areas as quickly as they normally would.

    “We don’t have many people to drive trucks or operate equipment,” said Marcus Thompson, a spokesman for the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

  • Bingo Winter Storm

    WCNC chief meteorologist Brad Panovich shared a hilarious image of “winter storm bingo” on Twitter before the weekend storm.

    “Get your winter storm bingo cards ready for the weekend,” he wrote.

    “While also preparing for significant amounts of ice and no snow.”

  • The snow-free period is over

    Atlanta, Georgia was affected by the storm.

    The snowfall ended the city’s nearly four-year streak with no measurable amount of snow.

  • Midwest predicts more snowfall

    Anywhere 6 to 12 inches of snow is expected to cover from the eastern Dakotas to western Minnesota and Iowa, AccuWeather speak.

    Minneapolis, Des Moines, St. Louis and Kansas City are both in the path of the storm.

    Tough driving conditions are expected throughout the area.

  • Midwest saw snow on Friday

    Heavy snow fell Friday across a large swath of the Midwest, where travel conditions turned bad and scores School is closed or go to the online tutorial.

    The National Weather Service has issued winter storm warnings for parts of Minnesota, the Dakotas, Iowa and Illinois, where forecasters could see up to 10 inches (24 cm) of snow.

    The weather service said on Twitter: “This snow will combine with strong winds to create slippery roads, snow cover and significantly reduced visibility. “Sometimes traveling can become dangerous and dangerous.”

  • Storm continues in Pittsburgh

    Meteorologist Justin Michaels shared footage of Pennsylvania, and said the city could see 2-4 inches more snow as the storm moves north.

  • More shots of upstate New York

    Depending on your location, you could see anywhere from 2 to 18 inches of snow, according to Spectrum News host Robert Guaderrama.

  • Upstate New York was hit hard

    One Twitter user shared footage of the storm in upstate New York, with roads completely covered.

  • New York snow plow in action

    A tractor in Albany was photographed this morning.

    The NYS Highways Administration warns visitors to maintain a safe distance from plows as they work to clear the road.

  • Pittsburg, PA see about six inches

    Weather Channel correspondent Justin Michaels says the city has received an estimated 6 inches of snowfall, with an additional 2-4 inches expected.

    Michaels also warned that winds could reach 45mph.

  • North and South Carolina were hit hard

    North Carolina recorded 34,566 blackouts, and South Carolina 31,922., Theo poweroutage.us.

    According to reports, parts of North Carolina saw up to 10 inches of snowfall.

    The National Guard has been deployed in South Carolina to help the state with cleanup efforts.

    “At the direction of South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster, the South Carolina National Guard has activated approximately 120 service members ready to assist our state partners in response to winter weather that affects to parts of the state,” U.S. Army Major General. Van McCarty said in a statement Sunday.

    McCarty is an adjutant general of South Carolina.

  • State of emergency

    As Hurricane Izzy swept across the United States, 260,000 people lost power, 3,000 flights were canceled and five states declared a state of emergency.

    The storm will eventually affect many parts of the country when it makes landfall in the Northeast on Sunday after pounding the South with snow, ice and wind.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/17329138/winter-storm-izzy-snow-totals-path-map-live/ Izzy 2022 Blizzard Live Update – Snow total revealed on map as winter storm hits New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio

Huynh Nguyen

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