Local

Instagram will now let users know when to pause using the app

Just a day before the head of Instagram faces questions from lawmakers about its child safety practices, the company is rolling out a number of new features aimed at making users, especially teenagers, it’s hard to fall down rabbit holes that can be harmful On Tuesday, the company launched a Take a Break tool, which will encourage users to take time away from the platform later when they have scrolled the page for a certain amount of time. The feature, announced in September, will first come to users in the US, UK, Canada and Australia, and to all users in the coming months. Users can enable the feature in “Settings” and choose if they want to be alerted after using the platform for 10 minutes, 20 minutes or 30 minutes. They’ll then receive a full-screen alert telling them to close an app, asking them to take a deep breath, write it down, check a to-do list, or listen to a song. CNN Business tested the feature prior to launch. ; While it’s a step in the right direction, there’s still room for improvement. For example, the user must be on the platform for a persistent session. If the app closes when you run to the bathroom or the screen turns off when you briefly browse Netflix, the timer resets. After the prompt encourages a break, the user must resist tapping the word “done” at the bottom of the message to return to the app. In its early stages and will expand in functionality by 2022 .nstagram also said it will take a “more rigorous approach” to the content it recommends for teenagers and actively promote them according to different topics if they’re researching something – any kind of content. – too long. While the company says it will share more about the feature soon, a screenshot shared with CNN Business ahead of the announcement shows that topics like travel destinations, architecture, and photography nature will be used to redirect attention. This feature will roll out next year. These features build on Instagram’s existing time management tools, such as one that lets people know when they’ve reached the total amount of time they want to spend on Instagram each day. The company says it’s also testing a new way for people to manage their Instagram activity in one place, allowing them to bulk delete photos and videos they’ve posted, as well as previous likes and comments. “While it’s available to everyone, I think this tool is especially important for teens to more fully understand what information they’ve shared on Instagram, what others are showing, and how easier to manage their digital footprint,” Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, wrote in Tuesday’s blog post. The company is also working on an education hub for parents with tips from experts to help them discuss social media use with their teens, as well as the ability to they see how much time their kids spend on Instagram and set time limits. about social media’s impact on teenagers gained renewed attention this fall after Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen leaked hundreds of internal documents, some of which showed the company knew How Instagram can take a toll on my mental and physical health. Facebook has repeatedly tried to discredit Haugen and say her testimony in Congress and reports of the documents misinterpreted the company’s actions. But the outcry from Haugen’s revelations has pressured the company to rethink launching an Instagram app for children under 13. Snapshot. On Wednesday, Mosseri will appear before a Senate subcommittee as lawmakers question the app’s impact on young users’ mental health. Some lawmakers are currently pushing for legislation to strengthen children’s privacy online and reduce the apparent addiction of various platforms – although it remains unclear when or if that law will be enacted. through. from time to time, such as videos of top creators appearing in the feed to encourage users to take a break and do something in real life.

Just a day before the head of Instagram faces questions from lawmakers about its child safety practices, the company is rolling out a number of new features aimed at making users, especially teenagers, the difficulty of falling down rabbit holes can be harmful to their mental health.

On Tuesday, the company launched a Take a Break tool, which will encourage users to take time away from the platform after they’ve scrolled a page for a certain amount of time. Feature, announced in September, will first come to users in the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, and to all users in the coming months.

Users can enable the feature in “Settings” and choose if they want to be alerted after using the platform for 10 minutes, 20 minutes or 30 minutes. They’ll then receive a full-screen alert telling them to close an app, asking them to take a deep breath, write it down, check a to-do list, or listen to a song.

CNN Business tested the feature prior to launch; While it’s a step in the right direction, there’s still room for improvement. For example, the user must be on the platform for a persistent session. If the app closes when you run to the bathroom or the screen turns off when you briefly browse Netflix, the timer resets. Once the prompt encourages a break, users will resist tapping “done” at the bottom of the message to return to the app.

Vaishnavi J, Instagram’s head of safety and well-being, says the feature is still in its early stages and will expand its functionality in 2022.

Instagram also says it will take a “more rigorous approach” to the content it recommends to teens, and actively push them along different topics if they’ve noticed something – any kind of content – too long. While the company says it will share more about the feature soon, a screenshot shared with CNN Business ahead of the announcement shows that topics like travel destinations, architecture, and photography nature will be used to redirect attention. This feature will be available next year.

These features build on Instagram’s existing time management tools, such as one that lets people know when they’ve reached the total amount of time they want to spend on Instagram each day. The company says it’s also testing a new way for people to manage their Instagram activity in one place, allowing them to bulk delete photos and videos they’ve posted, as well as previous likes and comments.

“While it’s available to everyone, I think this tool is especially important for teens to fully understand the information they’ve shared on Instagram, what’s visible to others, and how easier to manage their digital footprint,” Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, wrote in Tuesday’s blog post.

The company is also working on an education hub for parents with tips from experts to help them discuss social media use with teenagers, as well as the ability to let them watch their kids. how much time I spend on Instagram and set time limits.

The issue of social media’s impact on teenagers returned to the spotlight this fall after Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen leaked hundreds of internal documents, some of which show public opinion. We know how Instagram can be damaging to mental health and body image, especially among teenage girls.

Facebook has repeatedly tried to discredit Haugen and say her testimony in Congress and reports of the documents falsified the company’s actions. But the outcry from Haugen’s revelations has forced the company to rethink launching an Instagram app for children under 13.

The revelations also helped spur a series of congressional hearings on how tech products affect children, featuring executives from Facebook, TikTok and Snapchat’s parent company, Snap. On Wednesday, Mosseri will appear before a Senate subcommittee as lawmakers question the app’s impact on young users’ mental health.

Members of Congress have shown a rare bipartisanship in criticizing tech companies on the issue. Some lawmakers are currently pushing for legislation to strengthen children’s privacy online and reduce the apparent addiction of various platforms – although it remains unclear when or if that law will be passed. via.

Early last year, TikTok introduced new features that let users track their device time, such as videos of top creators appearing in the feed to incentivize users. take a break and do something in real life.

https://www.kcra.com/article/instagram-tell-users-when-to-take-a-break-from-app/38447385 Instagram will now let users know when to pause using the app

JOE HERNANDEZ

USTimeToday is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@ustimetoday.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button