Entertainment

Inside the medical network that cut London trauma deaths by 50% in 12 years

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NINTCHDBPICT000714096762Credit: The Garden

A Royal FORMER Marine was nearly paralyzed after a fall that nearly separated his neck from his spine.

The injury is said to have occurred when Wesley fell from his chair.

From left to right: Chloe Baker, Dr Jonathan Leung, William Harvey, Tiffany, Dr Morgan McMonagle and Naomi Felthouse

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From left to right: Chloe Baker, Dr Jonathan Leung, William Harvey, Tiffany, Dr Morgan McMonagle and Naomi FelthouseCredit: Tom Barnes / Channel 4
Barman Danilo, 28, from North West London, was taken by air ambulance after crashing his motorbike

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Barman Danilo, 28, from North West London, was taken by air ambulance after crashing his motorbikeCredit: The Garden
Patients are usually taken to the hospital by Lily so they can receive specialist treatment as quickly as possible

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Patients are usually taken to the hospital by Lily so they can receive specialist treatment as quickly as possibleCredit: The Garden

The 78-year-old man suffered frequent falls and was taken to Ealing Hospital, West London, after blood tests found dangerously high levels of calcium in his blood.

He had surgery to remove the thyroid gland in his neck, which was causing the increased calcium levels – but the scans before the surgery also showed damage to the spine.

He was then transferred to St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, central London – where he was filmed for the new Channel 4 documentary series Emergency, which airs nightly on Channel 4 from today until 3 March .

Wesley, who is now recovering from surgery, recalls: “I was told that my spine was very unstable and that was why I struggled to stand up and keep my balance.

“I was later told I might need surgery, but they initially put a collar in place to keep my neck in place and prevent further damage to my spine. I kept that for three months. ”

Wesley, of Northolt, West London, later suffered from epilepsy and was told that without surgery he could be paralyzed for life.

“I was in the military, and went to places where I had bullets flying everywhere,” he said. But there’s nothing scarier than being told you could be disabled for life.

“I’ve always been very active. I used to run 10 miles a day and am a boxer. I said yes to surgery. I had no other choice.”

Accidents like the Wesley accident are everyone’s worst nightmare, but trauma kills SIX MILLION people a year worldwide, including 16,000 in the UK. It is the leading cause of death in people under the age of 44, and many survivors develop a life-changing disability.

The new documentary follows the work of the London Trauma System – a network of 39 hospitals with ambulance and air ambulance services set up in the wake of the bombings of buses and trains. underground in London on 7 July 2005.

It aims to save lives by sending patients to large units where specialists are available to help with diverse and complex injuries.

It treats more than 12,000 people each year, and since it was founded in 2010, trauma survival rates have increased by 50%.

Surgeon Dr Morgan McMonagle, director of trauma training for the Royal College of Surgeons, is among those featured in the programme.

He said of his NHS colleagues: “Every day there are surprises. When a crisis hits, be it a stabbing or a mass casualty situation, you can really see the well-oiled machine at its best.

“This was highlighted in 2017 by the response to the Westminster Bridge and London Bridge attacks and the Grenfell fire tragedy.

“The British public should be very proud of the NHS. When you see us coming together under severe trauma, that’s when you see us at our best. I call it the Trauma Justice League.”

‘VERY PROUD’

The program also featured London Air Ambulance Service registrar, Dr. Chloe Baker; Dr. Jonathan Leung, consultant at William Harvey Hospital in Ashford, Kent; Dr. Tasha Newton, a consultant anesthesiologist and trauma unit director at the same hospital; Naomi Felthouse, a senior physiotherapist at King’s College Hospital in central London; and Tiffany, a trauma nurse at St George’s Hospital in South London.

Dr. Baker’s own life was saved after she was hit by a truck while cycling in 2007, when a 21-year-old student. Now she helps save others.

She said of her roadside rescuers: “I only remember their orange ankles, turtlenecks and black boots, but to this day I still remember the calmness in their voices.”

Dr Newton is also associate clinical director for South East London, Kent and Medway. “I oversee the care of critically ill patients, making decisions about equipment, training and patient journeys that are needed,” she said. I never hang up a call.

“I also treat patients in person about once a week at the William Harvey hospital. The rest of the week, I’m a consultant anesthesiologist. One day a week, I work as a resuscitator transferring severely unwell patients between hospitals.

Dr. Leung showed up when 17-year-old Frazer arrived after a fall, and the scans revealed a life-changing injury. Dr Leung and his team worked to stabilize him before he could be transferred to more specialist care at King’s College Hospital.

Meanwhile, Wesley said when he looked back at his own footage, he found it hard to believe it was him.

Over the course of 10 hours, a metal plate was fitted to the base of his skull to reconnect his neck to his spine. When he woke up, the doctor asked him to lift his arms and legs – and he recalls: “Despite the limitation, I was able to move. He said it was a good sign, and I have never felt so relieved.”

Wesley then went into rehabilitation. “Progress was slow, but I was finally able to go up and down the stairs, and was released to live with my sister,” he said.

“When I watched the footage of myself, I was shocked. I look like a shadow of the man I once was. But slowly, day by day, I am returning to my old self. The medical staff on the injury team are at the peak of their game. Without them, I probably wouldn’t be able to walk.”

‘THIS TOP GAME’

The documentary was shot last year over two weeks in July. Viewers witnessed a patient with a chainsaw injury, a one-year-old being crushed under a TV, a teenager falling off a 30ft cliff and a man being crushed by an air conditioning unit. 400kg gas.

But one of the most harrowing stories is about 12-year-old Lily, who fought for her life after being hit by a car traveling at 50 km/h, sending her flying 10. meters along the way.

She suffered a broken pelvis and hip, and suffered two convulsions after the impact, which paramedics feared had caused a severe traumatic brain injury.

Lily was airlifted to St George’s hospital, where doctors placed her in a coma to reduce brain swelling.

Then the surgeons fixed her hip. It was a success – but if it hadn’t, Lily may have struggled to walk as she would have had different lengths of legs.

She went home in a wheelchair after two weeks in the hospital and is now recovering well.

The documentary also shows Wayland, 53, being given the green light to go to St Mary’s hospital after being stabbed outside a restaurant.

He had a wound about 10cm wide in his abdomen and was bleeding profusely. Fortunately, the blade missed vital organs, and after emergency surgery, Wayland was immobilized and sent home the next day.

This is the first time the inner workings of the London Trauma System have been shown on TV. It includes four major trauma centers in the capital – St George’s Hospital, St Mary’s Hospital, King’s College Hospital and Royal London Infirmary – as well as 35 centers in Greater London and home counties.

Barman Danilo, 28, from North West London, was taken by air ambulance after crashing his motorbike. Paramedics call a red code when they believe a patient may have only minutes to live.

Danilo suffered multiple injuries including a ruptured aorta – the main artery that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body.

He also suffered pelvic fractures, broken wrists, and dislocated legs – where the top layers of skin and body tissue were ripped from the underlying muscles, ligaments and bones, which in itself could be life-threatening.

About 90% of patients with ruptured aorta die, but Danilo is rushed to surgery, where doctors place a stent to try to immobilize the aorta and stop bleeding.

He spent three weeks in the trauma center before being transferred to a treatment ward for health care, and finally reunited with his girlfriend Giulia. As he recovered, he said: “Everybody from the doctor to the nurses and the paramedics are heroes to me.”

  • You can watch Emergency on Channel 4 at 9 p.m. tonight and at the same time for the next three nights.
Former Royal Marine Wesley was nearly paralyzed after a fall that nearly separated his neck from his spine

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Former Royal Marine Wesley was nearly paralyzed after a fall that nearly separated his neck from his spineCredit: The Garden
A young patient being treated by a nurse at the Royal London Hospital

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A young patient being treated by a nurse at the Royal London HospitalCredit: The Garden

https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/17789797/medical-network-trauma-deaths-cut-london/ Inside the medical network that cut London trauma deaths by 50% in 12 years

Dais Johnston

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