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Designers used e-scooters thrown into rivers to make furniture, which proves

The canals of Malmo, Sweden hold all sorts of curiosities. Like many urban waterways, they are littered with discarded shopping carts, bicycles and dead electric scooters that have been in the water for two years. Many people would dismiss them as junk, but for a group of designers, junk became treasure.

[Photo: courtesy Andra Formen]

The fledgling design studio called Andra Formen (or ‘second form’ in Swedish) worked with divers who fished around 20 scooters out of Malmö’s canals, most of which were dumped near the city’s central station. They then disassembled them into individual parts, creating a kit of parts that were used to create unique pieces of furniture. The collection includes lamps, a hydroponic planter, a chair and a large grill, and all are made from recycled handlebars, steering columns and hubcaps from scooters like Tier, Lime and Voi.

[Photo: courtesy Andra Formen]

Electric scooter companies often position their machines as green because they are electric, and a scooter share program can help close transit gaps while reducing car journeys. But the e-scooter craze has an unexpected consequence: they are often destroyed and thrown away. From Portland Willamette Riverto Oakland Lake Merrittto the canals of Malmo, scooters end up on the bottom of city waterways where toxic lithium batteries can drain and pollute the environment.

[Photo: courtesy Andra Formen]

About a year ago, an article appeared in Malmö’s local newspaper stating that more than 200 scooters were lying at the bottom of Malmö’s canals. “Some of them grew barnacles,” says Christian Svensson, who founded Andra Formen with three other designers.

[Photo: courtesy Andra Formen]

After a quick flush, the team disassembled each scooter (with more than 50 rusty bolts, Svensson says, even that was a challenge) and began looking for inspiration in each component. “We tried to stay true to the shapes of the scooters,” says Oskar Olsson, who designed many of the desk lamps. “Some even have dents and scratches, and they tell a story about the life it had before.”

[Photo: courtesy Andra Formen]

The designers used 3D printed parts to connect some components together, but mostly they tried to reuse scooter parts. For the desk lamp, Ollson used the hubcap as the base and a handlebar for the neck and head. For the floor lamp, Jingbei Zheng used a dead battery – the heaviest part of the scooter – to weigh down the lamp. And for the chair, Peder Nillson used a fusion of seven scooters: the legs consist of two Bolt bars and two Tier bars; The seat and back seat are made from several scooter decks. The whole thing is assembled with connectors from Voi Scooters. “It’s a whole puzzle,” says Nilsson.

[Photo: courtesy Andra Formen]

The studio sells each piece on its website (prices range from $200 to around $800, and divers get a cut, too). It might be difficult to scale up an operation that requires so many puzzle pieces and so much work, but the collection is a welcome reminder that with a little ingenuity, dead scooters can be repurposed into something useful. “We wanted to show that you can actually do something with waste,” says Svensson. “It doesn’t have to go to the dump.”

https://www.fastcompany.com/90733824/designers-used-e-scooters-tossed-in-rivers-to-make-furniture-proving-junk-can-find-purpose?partner=feedburner&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=feedburner+fastcompany&utm_content=feedburner Designers used e-scooters thrown into rivers to make furniture, which proves

JACLYN DIAZ

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