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Deep Roots Perpetuated Residents Amid Devastation Mayfield Ky Tornado

MAYFIELD, Kentucky (WATE) – Grief and shock are enveloping the residents of Mayfield, Kentucky. On Friday, December 10, a tornado formed in Arkansas that cut a 200-mile roadway into four states, rearranging life and landscape while killing at least 74 Kentuckians. The storm hit the town of 10,000 people under the cover of darkness.

“I’m in the hallway with my three small dogs praying the Our Father over and over,” said Carrie Arp, an animal shelter worker born and raised in Mayfield. “I have never heard a train. I heard a crash on my roof, then it was completely silent.”

Arp said Monday that one of the victims was a corrections officer who was supervising inmates who worked at a prison. candle factory but collapsed. She speaks Officer Robert Daniel was taking care of the prisoners when the tornado hit.

“He made sure his people and everyone around him was in a safe place, those prisoners were brought to the hospital with broken legs and belongings, but not one of those prisoners. killed,” Arp said. “Robert lost his life. Robert is a good man and he believes in doing what’s best for everyone. ”

Arp’s home is less than 2 miles from what many consider to be the worst-hit area in the town of 10,000 residents, but photos and video taken in Mayfield seem to suggest that everywhere is worse . Spiral-born storms are part of a weather system that cuts through towns and homes not only in Kentucky, but Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, Missouri and Illinois. Experts were still working Monday to determine the size of the tornado, or whether there was more than one tornado.

A local expert found himself on the other side of the storm on Friday night. Jennifer Rukavina Russell is a former meteorologist who owns a business in Mayfield.

“I can honestly talk about the 15 years I’ve spent protecting hurricanes in this area, which is beyond and beyond anything I’ve ever seen in my life,” Russell said. The building that housed Jeannette’s Mayfield Flower Company was damaged beyond repair.

“This is very emotional for the residents here as they have put so much pride, time, effort and money into preserving this historic district,” Russell said, adding that she looks forward to heard tornado rated around EF-4. That means finding evidence of severe winds at 207-260 mph on the Fujita Scale.

That wind changed the landscape forever, she said. It will take a long time to rebuild what has been lost. The town’s roots stretch from 200 years to circa 1818. It became the county seat of Graves County in 1821.

An aerial shot of Mayfield, Kentucky (left) by Getty Images is compared here with a screenshot of the same area from Google Maps. A bright blue building in the upper right corner is Jeanette’s Mayfield Flower Company, owned by Jennifer Rukavina Bidwell. The building was so damaged by the storm that it couldn’t open for business safely.

Robert Nanney, UT Martin’s President of Communications and Desden Baptist Church’s Secretary of Music, noted the damage to historic structures in Mayfield, including a historic hotel. He lives just south of town.

“It is cruel. It was thrilling. You can watch the videos, you can hear about it, but when you’re there, it’s overwhelming,” said Nanney. “You have both gratitude that we were forgiven, but only a feeling of deep-seated sadness that envelopes you for all those who lost their property, buildings and homes, and for those who lost their lives. business won’t come back, or won’t come back for a long time”.

Russell and Nanny both agree that although the road ahead is littered with debris, the town will move forward and rebuild together. Arp, who looks after lost pets, agrees.

“Everybody in Mayfield is traumatized right now,” Arp said, noting that residents who lost everything were bringing plates full of rice, beans, and chicken to staff shelters. “But we’re a small town and we stick together.”

https://fox8.com/news/deep-roots-sustain-residents-amid-mayfield-ky-tornado-destruction/ Deep Roots Perpetuated Residents Amid Devastation Mayfield Ky Tornado

DUSTIN JONES

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