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California plans to become an abortion mecca if Roe turns the tide

With more than two dozen states poised to ban abortion if the U.S. Supreme Court allows them next year, California clinics and their allies in the state Legislature on Wednesday revealed plans to ban abortion. plans to make the state a “mecca” for those seeking reproductive care, including paying for travel, accommodation and procedures for people from other states. Roe v. Wade – 48-year-old decision bans states from outlawing abortion. Recommendations are not just free-spirited fantasies. Some of the state’s most important policymakers helped write them, including Toni Atkins, a San Diego Democrat who led the state Senate and attended numerous meetings. Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom started the group on his own, and in an interview last week with the Associated Press said several Newsom reports said details would be included in his budget proposal in January.” We’re going to be a sanctuary,” Newsom said, adding that he knew patients would likely come to California from other states for abortions. “We’re looking to support that inevitability and look to expand our protections.” California already pays for abortions for many low-income residents through the state’s Medicaid program. And California is one of six states that require private insurance companies to cover abortions, although many patients still end up paying deductibles and copays. California’s coffers have skyrocketed throughout the pandemic, fueling a record budget surplus this year. Next year, the state’s Office of Independent Legislative Analysts predicts California will run a surplus of about $31 billion. Texas law banning abortions after six weeks of pregnancy has been allowed into effect. Clinics in California reported a slight increase in patients from Texas. Now, California abortion providers are asking California to make it easier for those people to get to the state. The report proposes funding – including public spending – to assist patients who want an abortion with travel expenses such as gas, accommodation, commuting and childcare. It requires legislators to refund providers of abortion services to people who cannot afford them — including those who came to California from other states with incomes low enough for them to qualify. sue for state-funded abortions under Medicaid if they live there. It’s unclear how many people will go to California for abortions if the Roe v. Wade case is overturned. California does not collect or report statistics on abortion. The Guttmacher Institute, a research group that advocates for abortion rights, says 132,680 abortions were performed in California in 2017, representing about 15 percent of all abortions nationwide. That number includes people from out of state as well as teenagers who are not required to have parental permission to have an abortion in California. Fabiola Carrion, Interim Director of Sexual and Reproductive Health at the National Health Law Program, said last year. She said out-of-state abortions are also likely to be a later, more complicated and costly procedure. in rural areas, helping them pay off student loans and assist with their monthly liability insurance premiums. “We are looking at how to build capacity and build the workforce,” said Jodi Hicks, CEO of Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California. “There will be cooperation and investment with the state.” Meanwhile, anti-abortion advocates in California are also bracing for a potential surge of patients from other states looking for the procedure — only they hope to convince them not to do it. The president and CEO of the California Family Council, said California has about 160 pregnancy support centers with the purpose of convincing women not to have an abortion. About half of those centers are medical clinics, he said, while the rest are faith-based counseling centers. Keller said many have planned to increase staffing if California receives an increase in patients. Keller said. He added: “In many ways, that work will be even more important, both by the Supreme Court’s decision and whatever Sacramento decides they will do in response.”

With more than two dozen states poised to ban abortion if the U.S. Supreme Court allows them next year, California clinics and their allies in the state Legislature on Wednesday revealed plans to ban abortion. plans to make the state a “mecca” for those seeking reproductive care, including being able to pay for travel, accommodation and procedures for people from other states.

The California Future Abortion Council, which includes more than 40 abortion providers and advocacy groups, has put together a list of 45 recommendations for the state to consider if the high court overturns Roe v. Wade – the decision 48 years old bans states from outlawing abortion.

Recommendations are not just a free fantasy. Some of the state’s most important policymakers helped write them, including Toni Atkins, a San Diego Democrat who led the state Senate and attended numerous meetings.

Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom formed the group himself and in an interview last week with The Associated Press said some details of the report would be included in his budget proposal in January.

“We’re going to be a sanctuary,” Newsom said, adding that he knew patients would likely come to California from other states for abortions. “We are looking at ways to support that inevitability and looking at ways to expand our protections.”

California has paid for abortions for many low-income residents through the state’s Medicaid program. And California is one of six states that require private insurance companies to cover abortions, although many patients still have to pay deductibles and copays.

But money won’t be an issue for state-funded abortion services for patients from other states. California’s coffers have skyrocketed throughout the pandemic, fueling a record budget surplus this year. Next year, the state’s independent Office of Legislative Analysis predicts California will run a surplus of about $31 billion.

The California affiliates of Planned Parenthood, the nation’s largest abortion service provider, got a sneak preview of how people can seek an abortion outside of their home state this year as Texas law banning abortions after six weeks of age is allowed to go into effect. Clinics in California reported a slight increase in patients from Texas.

Now, California abortion providers are asking California to make it easier for those people to get to the state.

The report proposes funding – including public spending – to assist patients who want an abortion with travel expenses such as gas, accommodation, commuting and childcare. It requires legislators to refund providers of abortion services to people who cannot afford them — including those who came to California from other states with incomes low enough for them to qualify. sue for state-funded abortions under Medicaid if they live there.

It’s not clear how many people would go to California to have an abortion if the Roe v. Wade case was overturned. California does not collect or report statistics on abortion. The Guttmacher Institute, a research group that advocates for abortion rights, says 132,680 abortions were performed in California in 2017, representing about 15 percent of all abortions nationwide. That number includes people from out of state as well as teenagers who are not required to have parental permission to have an abortion in California.

Planned Parenthood, which accounts for about half of all abortion clinics in California, said it served 7,000 people from other states last year.

“It will certainly destabilize the abortion provider network,” said Fabiola Carrion, Interim Director of Sexual and Reproductive Health at the National Health Law Program. She said out-of-state abortions can also be procedures with later deadlines, complexity and cost.

The report recommends that lawmakers help clinics increase their workforce to prepare for more patients by awarding scholarships to medical students committed to providing abortion services in rural areas. help them pay off their student loans and assist with their monthly liability premium.

“We are looking at how to build capacity and build the workforce,” said Jodi Hicks, CEO of Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California. “It will need cooperation and investment with the state.”

Meanwhile, California’s abortion advocates are also preparing a potential influx of patients from other states to seek out the procedure – only they hope to convince them not to do it. .

Jonathan Keller, president and CEO of the California Family Council, said California has about 160 pregnancy support centers with the goal of convincing women not to have an abortion. About half of those centers are medical clinics, he said, while the rest are faith-based counseling centers.

Many centers located near abortion clinics aim to entice people to seek their advice before deciding to have an abortion. Keller said many are already planning to increase their staff if California receives an increase in patients.

“Even if we don’t face any immediate chance of legislative victory or legislative victory, it is a reminder that work changes hearts and minds, while providing support and a real resource for women with unplanned pregnancies – that work will continue,” Keller said.

He added: “In many ways, that work will be even more important, both by the Supreme Court’s decision and whatever Sacramento decides they will do in response.”

https://www.kcra.com/article/california-plans-to-be-abortion-sanctuary-if-roe-overturned/38462495 California plans to become an abortion mecca if Roe turns the tide

JOE HERNANDEZ

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