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Asian-American says she was called ‘Cadet COVID’ while in police academy

Nan Zhang came to the US 15 years ago, naturalized and decided he wanted to serve the new country. “It was (to) protect my community.” But her plans to become an Albuquerque police officer were cut short, she said, when she was forced to resign. She claims in a lawsuit that she was abused, discriminated against, and nicknamed “Cadet COVID.” “People keep telling me you don’t belong here,” Zhang said. “They tell me these things every day. This is harassment. I mean, it’s just because of my age, language and race. “Now, Target 7 is being notified that the Department of Justice has contacted Zhang’s attorney. Target 7 has contacted the US Attorney’s office and they will not confirm or deny an investigation. The APD says they don’t believe the DOJ is reviewing Zhang’s claims and in legal documents the city’s attorneys denied that Zhang was kicked out of the academy and she was instead. The city’s attorneys also denied any academy staff had discriminated against Zhang. Zhang said: “I’m an American citizen, I’m an American.” And, my rights equal to everyone else, but they treat me so differently.” KOAT legal expert John Day said there are a lot of allegations for the DOJ to look at. “The Department of Justice, that’s one of their jobs,” Day said. investigate allegations of civil rights violations. The Department of Justice has an obligation to investigate. If they are indeed investigating, that means they have some information that led them to decide that we must look further. problem.” Zhang moved to America about 15 years ago. She ended up going to Albuquerque and decided to become a police officer after her home was broken into twice in the same week.” I work Zhang said she is To become a police officer, the officer had to complete 26 weeks of training at the APD Law Enforcement Academy.In her lawsuit, Zhang said that academy staff made her sign a resignation letter in which she said, “I believe her has been quoted — unfit for the role.” Before Zhang signed that letter, she said she experienced weeks of what she calls “abuse.” She claims everything who kept telling her they couldn’t understand her English. Zhang hired an attorney transferred by the Albuquerque police to represent her. Grover himself graduated from the same academy. turned on for me when I looked at the record that Nan had when she gave her the account of what happened was how they got on top of her while the others were passing,” Grover said. . ” Article This u is completely inappropriate and doesn’t fit the typical tension that a police academy is having. “Earlier this year, the state’s workforce solutions division investigated her complaint and found no cause for the city to discriminate against her. Zhang says she still wants to be a police officer and serve her community. “I really want to be a cop.” “But I don’t think they will accept people who look like me. Looks different. Say otherwise. ”

Nan Zhang came to America 15 years ago, naturalized and decided he wanted to serve his new country.

“So my ultimate goal (is) to become an APD officer,” said Zhang, who is originally from China. “It (to) protect my community.”

But her plans to become an Albuquerque police officer were cut short, she said, when she was forced to resign. She claimed in a lawsuit that she experienced abuse, discrimination and was given the nickname “Cadet COVID”.

“People keep telling me you don’t belong here,” says Zhang, “They tell me these things every day. This is harassment. I mean, it’s just because of my age, language and race.”

Now, Target 7 is being notified that the Justice Department has contacted Zhang’s attorney.

Target 7 has contacted the US attorney’s office and they will not confirm or deny an investigation. The APD says they don’t believe the DOJ is reviewing Zhang’s claims, and in legal documents the city’s attorneys denied that Zhang was kicked out of the academy and she volunteered instead. quit one’s job. City attorneys also denied any reports that any academy staff members discriminated against Zhang.

“I’m an American citizen, I’m an American,” Zhang said. And, my rights are the same as everyone else’s, but they treat me too differently”.

KOAT legal expert John Day said there are numerous allegations for the DOJ to consider.

“The Department of Justice, that’s one of their jobs,” Day said. “One of their duties is to investigate allegations of civil rights violations. The Department of Justice is obligated to investigate. If they are in fact investigating, It means they have some information that led them to decide that we must look into the matter further. “

Zhang moved to the US about 15 years ago. She eventually went to Albuquerque and decided to become a police officer after her home was broken into twice in the same week.

“I practice every day trying to meet the APD requirement,” says Zhang.

Zhang tested and passed the APD physical speed tests and the flying color writing test
She then interviewed three senior police officers – two deputy sheriffs and a lieutenant – who all approved of her becoming a cadet.

To become a police officer, officers must complete 26 weeks of training at the APD Law Enforcement Academy. Zhang was and ended six weeks ago when she said she had been asked to resign.

In her lawsuit, she said that academy staff made her sign a resignation letter in which she said, “I have come to believe she has been quoted – unfit for the role.” this.”

Before Zhang signed that letter, she said she experienced weeks of what she calls “abuse”.
She says people keep telling her they can’t understand her English.

Zhang has hired retired police officer-turned-Albuquerque attorney, Tom Grover, to represent her. Grover graduated from the same academy

“What stood out to me when I looked at the file Nan had as she provided her account of what happened was how they were inhabiting her while the others were passing,” he said. Grover said. “This is completely inappropriate and inconsistent with the typical tension a police academy has. ”

Earlier this year, the state’s workforce solutions division investigated her complaint and found no cause for the city to discriminate against her.

Despite what she says she’s been through Zhang says she still wants to be a police officer and serve her community.

“Honestly, I really want to be a police officer,” Zhang said, “But I don’t think they will accept people like me.

https://www.kcra.com/article/asian-american-says-she-was-called-cadet-covid-while-in-police-academy/38430429 Asian-American says she was called ‘Cadet COVID’ while in police academy

JOE HERNANDEZ

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