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Women may pay the price for closing the gender pay gap once and for all

There was a lot of great news for women in the workplace last month. First, Pew Research released a new analysis by US census data that revealed In 22 metropolitan areas of the country, women under 30 earn more than men of the same age. While the numbers vary by region, in New York City and Washington, DC, women earn 102% of what men the same age earn, rising to a really whopping 120% in Wenatchee, Washington — a big city a few hours west of Seattle.

Across the country, young women now earn a total of 93 cents on the dollar, according to Pew — with economists attributing that persistent 7 cent difference to the fewer hours young women work compared to men. Adjusting for factors like job title, education, experience, industry, job level, and hours worked, that number jumps to a hair-splitting 99 cents on the dollar, according to Payscale’s recently released 2022 State of the Dollar Report on the gender pay gap.

While this is certainly good news for women, it does point to some worrying trends for men. As women (finally) achieve economic equality, men and boys continue to fall behind.

Women now make up 60% of all college students in the US, which helps them outperform men in most major urban areas across the country. It's also worrying "college gap."
Women now make up 60% of all college students in the US, which helps them outperform men in most major urban areas across the country. It also creates a worrying “college gap.”
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As the “wage gap” closes, a “partner gap” takes its place – and women struggle to find a desirable match for marriage and motherhood. Evolutionary psychologists say that women are more likely to be attracted to men who are better educated and/or better paid because sex can have a high cost for women – namely pregnancy and childbirth.

The theory goes that women seek a partner who can ensure that they are fed, cared for and protected during pregnancy – as well as the well-being of their offspring after birth and, rarely, if she dies in childbirth. Finding men with higher or even the same income and academic status is becoming more and more difficult due to the college gap that is widening from year to year.

This gender gap in college is important. 2021 almost 60% of college students were women. This statistic, coupled with declines in manufacturing and low-skilled job opportunities for less educated men, means that many Gen Z women and the youngest Millennial women often earn better than men. These gaps make it harder for women to find a partner who earns at the same level as them. It also makes it hard to find love. Despite a deep desire for love and motherhood, many young women remain single and childless. The CDC
reported in 2012 that 80% of unmarried women aged 15 to 44 are childless. And of that group, 81% plan or hope to have children someday.

That "wage difference," Long considered a crucial symbol of gender parity, for many Millennials and Gen Z women, no longer exists. But does this access to income come at the expense of finding love?
The “wage gap,” long considered a crucial symbol of gender parity, no longer exists for many Millennials and Gen Z women. But does this access to income come at the expense of finding love?
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The new challenge for women is not the “housing gap”; it’s about finding a desirable match for marriage and motherhood. Instead of continuing to focus on closing the pay gap, it’s time to consider it closed. We must turn our attention to them college gap – and to help empower boys and young men to pursue higher education, just as girl power programs have successfully done for girls and young women. We must promote academics and the career potential of young men. This will actually make girls and women better off and help society achieve true gender equality.

This process will not come easily. The academic gender gap starts early, with Girls ahead of boys in literacy in the fourth grade. Many believe that this is due to an innate female desire to focus on work and finish it on time. A similar mindset suggests that most boys need more time to exert themselves on their schoolwork.

However, it’s not just biological sex differences that give girls an edge. Sociologists Claudia Buchmann and Thomas DiPrete, authors of “The Rise of Women: The Widening Gender Gap in Education and What It Means for American Schools‘, found that many underperforming boys find hard work at school unmanly. Instead, they see manual labor and jobs that require physical strength as more masculine. Philosopher and feminist critic Christina Hoff Sommers, author of “The War on Boys: How Misguided Policies Harm Our Young Men‘, argues that educators need to take gender differences into account in order for more boys to succeed in school.

Women are now more likely to have their first child in their 30s or 40s, which many sociologists attribute to a focus on careers and education in their 20s.
Women are now more likely to have their first child in their 30s or 40s, which many sociologists attribute to a focus on careers and education in their 20s.
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For example, classrooms are set up so that girls learn best, such as B. that students must sit still, and not in the way boys learn best, such as e.g. B. fidgeting and being more active. Others, like economist David Figlio, say girls are less vulnerable to socioeconomic pressures, while boys are more likely to fail in low-income environments. In one study, Figlio found that while siblings perform equally well in high-performing schools in higher socioeconomic neighborhoods, sisters outperform their brothers in low-performing schools in lower socioeconomic communities.

Whatever the reasons, unless we make an early commitment to closing the education gap, the gap in higher education will continue to widen and women will continue to earn more than men. As a result, a woman is more likely to carry her first child thirty or forty, not in their twenties.

The good intentions of feminists have led to unforeseen results, at least in part. Young
Women have found equal pay for equal work. . . but still looking for love.

Melanie Notkin is the author of “Being Different: Modern day women finding a new kind of happiness.‘ Follow her on Twitter: @SavvyAuntie

https://nypost.com/2022/04/16/women-may-pay-the-price-for-finally-closing-the-gender-pay-gap/ Women may pay the price for closing the gender pay gap once and for all

DUSTIN JONES

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