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Wealthy New Yorkers may have to grapple with the bouncers’ strike

Residents in some of New York City’s most expensive luxury buildings may have to open doors, get their own packages and take out the trash themselves, while doormen, janitors, porters and other employees threaten to go on strike.

The union, which represents 30,000 workers at property managers Vornado Realty Trust and Related Cos. wants a new collective agreement by April 20, when the current agreement expires.

Management companies want to cut vacation days, sick days and healthcare bills, prompting the SEIU 32BJ union, which represents workers, to balk, according to Bloomberg News.

Tenants and property managers have been ordered to prepare for the possibility of a work stoppage, meaning residents would be responsible for common, day-to-day tasks such as security, garbage collection, cleaning and other services.

A Hoyt & Horn-managed building in Brooklyn said that while the company will hire a security guard, residents will be required to operate the intercom, screen guests and accept packages.

The union leader told Bloomberg that while several more rounds of negotiations are planned by April 20, “I don’t feel a lot of confidence.”

The union, which represents 30,000 doormen, porters, wardens and other employees, has resisted management's demands to cut sick days and paid time off.
The union, which represents 30,000 doormen, porters, wardens and other employees, has resisted management’s demands to cut sick days and paid time off.
Bloomberg via Getty Images

“This is not a time to go backwards, it’s a time to go forward,” union leader Kyle Bragg told Bloomberg.

But management team representatives said progress is being made.

“We will continue to work towards reaching a fair deal for both sides by April 20,” said Howard Rothschild, president of the Realty Advisory Board on Labor Relations, which is leading the negotiations.

The Post has reached out to Vornado and relatives for comment.

According to the union, construction workers earn an average of $26.45, which works out to $55,000 a year.

Many of the city's bouncers, who earn an average of $55,000 a year, say they are struggling to keep up with soaring inflation.
Many of the city’s doormen — who earn an average of $55,000 a year — say they’re struggling to keep up with soaring inflation.
Getty Images

Annual salary has increased by 3.3% per year under her current contract, which was signed in 2018.

But the cost of living has risen at a pace that has outpaced annual salary increases. According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, costs rose by around 5.1% in February compared to the same month last year.

Record inflation combined with rising rental costs in the city is prompting employees to demand a raise to keep up.

“With inflation, a lot of people are living paycheck to paycheck these days,” said Crystal Ann Johnson, a 35-year-old who works as a concierge at the Silver Towers in Manhattan.

“We will get what we deserve.”

https://nypost.com/2022/04/05/rich-new-yorkers-may-have-to-deal-with-doormen-strike/ Wealthy New Yorkers may have to grapple with the bouncers’ strike

JACLYN DIAZ

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