News

Response to SCOTUS abortion ruling reveals strong political divisions: poll

A new poll reveals deep political divisions in the country over the Roe v. Wade – About 77% of Democrats call it a “step backwards” and 64% of Republicans call it a “step forward.”

Just 13% of Democrats said they view Friday’s US Supreme Court ruling as a “step forward,” as do 24% of independents, the CBS News poll released Sunday showed. About 20% of Republicans call it a “regression,” along with 55% of independents.

Overall, 52% of those surveyed see the court’s momentous decision as a “step backwards”, 31% as a “step forward” and 17% as “not a step forward”.

About 59% of Americans disagree with the decision, including 67% of women.

41% agree, as do 33% of women.

The poll was conducted on Friday and Saturday after the court struck down the landmark 1973 case that upheld a woman’s right to an abortion – a decision that brought tears of joy to anti-abortion groups and anger and dismay to pro-choice groups.

The poll shows that 78% of Republicans approved the High Court’s lawsuit, along with 38% of Independents and 17% of Democrats.

Opinion poll.
52% of respondents support the Supreme Court’s decision to overthrow Roe. v. Wade as a “step back”.
CBS
People gather outside the US Supreme Court building during a rally.
The Supreme Court ruling sparked anger and dismay from pro-choice groups.
James Keivom

Dissenting were 83% of Democrats, 22% of Republicans and 62% of independents.

Of the Americans who claimed to have overthrown Roe v. In supporting Wade, 79% said they felt “hopeful,” 70% said they were “happy” and “relieved,” 51% chose “motivated,” 47% said “surprised,” and 12%. stated that they were “scared”.

Of those who wanted Roe v. Wade, 78% said they were “excited”, 72% described being “angry”, 62% said “anxious”, 38% said “surprised”, 32% said they were “motivated” and 10% were “hopeful”.

Americans were evenly divided on whether abortion should be legal in their state in all or most cases, with 32% saying it should be legal in most cases, while 27% said it should be illegal in most cases and 9% said it should should be illegal in all cases.

People gather outside the US Supreme Court building during a rally.
People gather during a rally outside the Supreme Court building following the Roe v. to fall Wade.
James Keivom
People gather outside the US Supreme Court building during a rally.
Of those who wanted Roe v. Wade, 78% said they were “excited”, 72% described being “angry” and 62% said they were “scared”.
James Keivom

About 58% supported Congress passing federal legislation legalizing abortion, while 42% opposed it.

When asked how the ruling might affect their turnout in November’s midterm elections, 50% of Democrats said it would make them “more likely” to vote, a view shared by 28% of independents and 20% of those Republicans agree with.

But 77% of Republicans, 61% of independents and 42% of Democrats said the decision will not affect their participation.

Opinion poll.
About 67% of women disagree with the Supreme Court decision.
CBS
People gather outside the US Supreme Court building during a rally.
The poll found that 50% of Democrats said the Roe v. Wade decision would make them “more likely” to vote.
Evelyn Hockstein/REUTERS

Small percentages — 8% Democrats, 10% Independents, and 3% Republicans — say it makes them “less likely” to vote.

The survey surveyed 1,591 adults and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

https://nypost.com/2022/06/26/reaction-to-scotus-abortion-ruling-reveals-stark-political-divisions-poll/ Response to SCOTUS abortion ruling reveals strong political divisions: poll

JACLYN DIAZ

USTimeToday is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – admin@ustimetoday.com. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Related Articles

Back to top button