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Now you can hear what your voice would sound like on Mars

In space, people actually can hear you scream (or sing)it turns out.

Groundbreaking data collected by NASA’s Perseverance rover can recreate how people on Mars would sound compared to Earth.

The space agency even has an online tool that Earthlings can use from the comfort of their own home to simulate how they would sound on the red planet.

That’s right: you can drop your own Martian bars in a round of interstellar karaoke.

To use it, just go to Mars sounds section Navigate to the NASA website You on Mars tab.then “click and hold the button to record your greeting,” per page.

Finally, download the audio file to hear how your voice sounds on Mars. Having tested the feature ourselves, The Post can safely say that the tin cans we spoke into as a child to replicate the “speak of Mars” weren’t too far off.

NASA has an online tool that Earthlings can use from their homes to simulate what we would sound like on the Red Planet.
NASA has an online tool that Earthlings can use from their homes to simulate what we would sound like on the red planet.
NASA

“If you were standing on Mars, you would hear a quieter, more muffled version of what you would hear on Earth, and you would wait a little longer to hear it.” wrote NASA on its website. “Some sounds that we are used to from Earth, such as whistles, bells or birdsong, would be almost inaudible on Mars.”

The findings were part of a groundbreaking study that calculated the speed of sound on the red planet.

To measure the speed of sound on the planet, the Perseverance rover fired a laser at a rock and recorded the sound it made on impact, according to results presented at the 53rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

Groundbreaking data collected by NASA's Perseverance rover can recreate how people on Mars would sound compared to Earth.
Groundbreaking data collected by NASA’s Perseverance rover can recreate how people on Mars would sound compared to those on Earth.
NY Post photocomposite

The researchers then measured the time of the laser fire against that of the sound reaching the recording device and compared it to sound data on the Earth’s surface. They reached the slower speed of sound on Mars at 840 km/h compared to 760 km/h on our home planet. This discrepancy has been attributed to the fact that the atmosphere on Mars is “completely different,” thereby affecting the way we perceive sound.

And while we can’t really test our voices on Mars itself – at least not until at least 2026 – Chair astronauts are also invited to use the Sounds of Mars tool to test, like others Earthly noises would ring out on the fourth rock from the sun. These include ocean waves, bicycle bells, city sounds, the classic piano number “Clair de Lune” and even Neil Armstrong’s iconic “One Small Step for Man” speech after his historic moon landing.

That’s right, you can hear how someone sounds on the moon…on Mars.

"If you were on Mars, you would hear a quieter, more muffled version of what you would hear on Earth, and you would wait a little longer to hear it." wrote Nasa on their website.
“If you were standing on Mars, you would hear a quieter, more muffled version of what you would hear on Earth, and you would wait a little longer to hear it,” NASA wrote on its website.
NASA

The site also features various shots representing the Perseverance picked up during his exploration missions, including driving a droid, a laser that “shoots up” a rock, and even a helicopter that flies over the planet.

In general, most sounded quieter and more muffled than on Earth, which NASA attributed to the “very different temperature, density, and chemistry” of the crimson space rock, the researchers wrote.

“The noise level you would hear would automatically be lower on Mars,” the results continue. “The Martian atmosphere is about 100 times less dense than Earth’s – meaning there’s just a lot less of it.

“Mars’ atmosphere, which is 96% carbon dioxide, would absorb many higher-pitched tones, leaving only lower-pitched tones traveling long distances,” NASA concluded.

Additionally, because of cold Martian surface temperatures, which average around -81°F, sounds would take much longer to reach the ear.

"The noise level you would hear would automatically be lower on Mars," the researchers wrote.
“The level of noise you would hear would automatically be lower on Mars,” the researchers write.
NASA

https://nypost.com/2022/03/25/now-you-can-hear-what-your-voice-would-sound-like-on-mars/ Now you can hear what your voice would sound like on Mars

Dais Johnston

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