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London braced for more pipe strikes after ‘threatened’ 600 jobs

More than 500 jobs on the London Underground could be at risk (Image: Getty)

Londoners could face more pipe strikes, with workers set to vote on industrial action from next week.

It comes after Transport for London revealed plans to cut hundreds of jobs underground amid budget crisis.

Between 500 and 600 posts are at stake, with the London Underground saying the impact of the pandemic on its finances has underpinned a program of ‘urgently needed’ change.

Unions hit the news, with the Railroad, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union confirming plans for a strike vote.

Nick Dent, customer operations manager for London Underground, said: ‘We engaged with our unions and employees to seek their views on how we can make LU work. more efficient and financially sustainable, while continuing to deliver the highest standards of safety, reliability and customer service.

‘We have now begun consultations with our unions on proposals to change the way we work in LU’s Customer Service sector.

‘We remain fully committed to maintaining our customer service offering, with stations being staffed at all times while trains are in operation.

‘The safety and security of our customers and colleagues remains our top priority and we will make sure in any case our staff will remain visible and ready to help customers. at all times – including the provision of on-demand Turn Up and Go services to assist customers with disabilities.

‘Changes will be closely monitored to ensure that the highest levels of safety and customer service continue to be met. Discussions are in the early stages and we will continue to work with our union employees and colleagues as proposals are developed. ‘

The RMT said it would vote its 10,000 members to strike, with the results announced early in the new year.

General Secretary Mick Lynch said: ‘A financial crisis at Transport for London has been deliberately designed by the Government to advance an agenda that cuts jobs, services, safety and threatens threaten the working conditions and pensions of our members.

‘Today we saw the opening attack turn into an all-out assault on safety-critical staff positions with 600 jobs on the block, mostly among members our station.

‘The vote will open on Monday and we will be campaigning for a big yes vote. Politicians need to be wary that transport officers will not pay the price for this carefully engineered crisis and we will coordinate a protest campaign with colleagues from other unions affected. affected by this threat. ‘

The Salaried Employees Association (TSSA) called the cuts “completely unacceptable” and the timing before Christmas “disgraceful”.

Lorraine Ward, the union’s organizational director, said: “We need to encourage more people to take public transport, but cutting station staff will derail that effort.

“Staff feared for their future and the way the London Underground misled this just weeks before Christmas is shameful.

“TSSA will fight these job losses and stand up for our members and passengers. We absolutely oppose any job cuts on the London Underground and TfL. ”

TSSA general secretary Manuel Cortes added: “The Tories must stop playing political football on public transport in our capital.

“The government must provide – as is the case with major cities around the world – the Mayor with the money he needs to keep services running and staff safe at all stations.”

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https://metro.co.uk/2021/12/07/london-braces-for-more-tube-strikes-after-threat-to-600-jobs-15731501/ London braced for more pipe strikes after 'threatened' 600 jobs

Huynh Nguyen

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