Tech

how digital avatars the futu could be

It was a technological feat that made history, wowed audiences, and brought a dead rapper back to life. In April 2012, at the Coachella Festival in California, Tupac Shakur performed with Snoop Dogg and Dr. turn up He had been dead 16 years, killed in a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas.

But that was Tupac the hologramfoul and lifelike, before a “amazed and then amazed” Quantity.

Ever since humans first became fascinated by the sound of music, advances in technology have managed to immortalize musical expression. Throughout history, innovators have strived to create original, accessible, and timeless performances.

As engineering knowledge developed, Musical instrument design advanced. Many classical composers featured pioneering instrumentation into their scores, adding depth and color that enhanced the listening experience.

Precise notation systems matured and offers music an essence of immortality through printed manuscript. 1853 Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville autograph pioneering work done sound recording technique.

In 1912 WC Handy composed memphis blues, a song that took the United States by storm and influenced the development of popular music. Released on paper, it was hugely popular in the dance halls and soon every band in America was being asked to play it. This public demand was met by a young recording industrywhich soon blossomed.

Technology = Creativity

A breakthrough in the quality of music recording came with the advent of Hi-Fi and Stereo introduced by Yamaha. Those who took an artistic approach to technology were able to transport a lifelike performance experience into the homes of the masses. One of the biggest bands of the 1970s and 1980s, The Swedish supergroup ABBAappropriated this technology, pioneering recording techniques that are still used as a standard today.

Behind this technology was the creative genius that fueled the millions of record sales and performances that dominated the 1970s and beyond. After the group’s apparent demise, Benny and Björn expanded into the theater genre and composed musicals. Their interest in new technologies laid the foundation to recapture and reinvent the ABBA machine 40 years later.

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[Photo: Flickr user Matt Brown]

May 2022 brings the latest technological advances in musical immortality when ABBA returns to the live stage after a 40-year absence. But this time they return as humanoids – the digital hologram “twins” of the original global phenomenon.

George Lucas Industrial light and magic has created holographic lookalikes interacting with a live band in a purpose-built theater in East London. Benny, Björn, Frida and Agnetha provided the pre-recorded vocals and motion capture movements, which are then reproduced by the digital avatars.

More youthful in appearance – around their thirties when they were at the height of their fame – the doppelgangers pose an interesting conundrum regarding ABBA’s human mortality versus their newfound immortality in the metaverse.

ABBA’s music is undoubtedly timeless; The simple melodies with incredibly complicated structures speak to millions. The “ABBAtars” are a reinvention for new audiences, but will they live on beyond the lives of their originals, with new creators pulling the strings?

Aside from ABBA and Tupac, there are other cases where “digital twinning” has been identified as a key money-making strategy. The digital tape Gorillaz’s 2006 Grammy performance mingled flawlessly with Madonnas; and the Richard Burton hologram accomplished on a world tour war of the Worlds in another performance from 2006.

Music in the Metaverse

Customizing 3D avatars has become a unique way for artists to create virtual brands across multiple digital platforms. You can connect with fans virtually and increase loyalty and engagement while allowing fans to interact, express themselves and experience new things.

This is now possible using AI software to create holograms, researchers at MIT demonstrated in an attempt which generated holograms fairly instantaneously.

ziva dynamics, a pioneer in simulation and real-time character creation, uses synthetic AI-powered avatars to create autonomous and complex motion simulations based on real muscle, fat, soft tissue and skin contact.

In April 2021 in a project called Lost Tapes of the 27 Club, Google’s Magenta AI has even been used to compose songs in the style of musicians who notoriously died at the age of 27, including Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison and Amy Winehouse.

These technologies have the potential to create realistic, synthetic, and holographic AI representations of deceased artists, allowing them to continue to create, influence, and perform for future audiences.

Epic GamesCreator of the phenomenally successful Fourteen days, predicts that digital twins are combined with the metaversean emerging network of fully immersive digital worlds.

Music business disruption

While live tours are time-consuming and expensive for new artists, an inexpensive Metaverse “tour” could be a new way for music lovers to see live performances. Virtual appearances by Justin Bieber, DeadMau5and the weekend have become popular lately.

In this burgeoning branch of the music industry, record labels and marketing companies could be replaced by decentralized autonomous organizations. DAOs are online organizations that act like cooperatives and make all decisions together.

DAOs already are disrupt the music business– along with NFTs (nonfungible tokens), which are a way of transferring property between people online. In October 2021, PleasrDAO – a collective of decentralized funding Guides, early NFT collectors and digital artists – paid $4 million for it Once upon a time in Shaolinan album by New York hip-hop legends Wu-Tang Clan.

While the album’s release predates the rise of NFTs, PleasrDAO now owns the rights and has imposed strict restrictions on its reproduction, distribution, or public display. A music-focused DAO like Pleasr can purchase concert tickets in bulk, fund and organize events. and manage fan-owned record labels and marketing agencies to secure investable merchandise like first-edition LPs, artwork, and instruments. Fans, new music genres and artists alike can benefit from this.

This creates a new, decentralized route to the market for artists, free from corporate interests or the interests of individual producers, and develops a more equitable landscape for the future. With digital avatars likely to be at the heart of this new avant-garde, it will be fascinating to see how it evolves over the coming months and years – and whether it will suffice for music audiences.

Theo Tzanidis is senior lecturer for digital marketing, University of the West of Scotland; and Stephen Langston is program director for performance, University of the West of Scotland. This article is republished by The conversation under a Creative Commons license. read this original article.

https://www.fastcompany.com/90741725/abba-and-tupac-in-the-metaverse-how-digital-avatars-could-be-the-future-of-live-music?partner=feedburner&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=feedburner+fastcompany&utm_content=feedburner how digital avatars the futu could be

JACLYN DIAZ

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