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Flood of migrant children in New York schools to boost DOE funding

The city’s education ministry rolls out the red carpet for migrant asylum seekers, helping them cut through bureaucracy to apply for at least one asylum application 1,500 cross-border children enrolled in public schools

The influx of school-age children — among the roughly 8,000 new arrivals busted into Manhattan by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott since May — will help the enrollment-starved DOE generate millions of dollars in new revenue.

More than half — or $12,725 — of the DOE’s $25,334 per student funding is picked up by state and federal governments, according to estimates by the watchdog Independent Budget Office.

Enrollment in New York schools fell to just over 1 million students through the 2021-22 school year — a drop of 87,000 students over the past two years, the DOE confirmed. This loss of students resulted in an annual loss of approximately $1.1 billion in state and federal funding for the DOE, based on the IBO estimates.

That 1,500 new students are expected to bring in $19.1 million in revenue for the nation’s largest school district, a number likely to rise as the Adams administration welcomes more migrants, immigrants and war refugees to the Big Apple, a so-called sanctuary city.

A picture of the Red Cross entrance at 520 West 49th Street.
NYC DOE confirmed that enrollment has fallen below 1 million students by the 2021-2022 school year.
Helayne Seidman

Councilor Joseph Borelli (R-Staten Island) said he opposes “illegal immigration” but called the city’s acceptance of migrants “an interesting way to get state and federal per capita funding for some of our understaffed schools.” “.

“I suppose if there’s a silver lining to the Biden migrant crisis, it’s this,” he said.

But Leonie Haimson, director of the advocacy group Class Size Matters, said whatever new funding the city gets will not be enough to meet the migrants’ huge needs.

“The DOE will have to spend more than it would otherwise get from just increased enrollment,” Haimson said.

A mother and her child walk through Hell's Kitchen in NYC.
Class Size Matters advocacy director Leonie Haimson said the city’s funds were not sufficient to meet the children’s needs.
Helayne Seidman

“These students will need additional services – including language classes and social workers to help with housing and food insecurity. Many of them may also have suffered from educational interruptions.”

In a four-page memo sent to school leaders Aug. 18, the DOE described the migrants as mostly two-parent households with multiple children, almost all of whom speak Spanish, and many now living in homeless shelters.

“The arriving families and children have endured an unknown degree of trauma to undertake this incredible journey to a city that represents hope, opportunity and a chance for a new life for many,” wrote Chancellor David Banks.

A photo of a hotel in NYC.
“The arriving families and children have endured an unknown degree of trauma to undertake this incredible journey to a city that represents hope, opportunity and a chance for a new life for many,” Chancellor David Banks wrote in a four-page memo.
Helayne Seidman

Migrant parents temporarily housed by the city at the Skyline Hotel in Hell’s Kitchen told the Post the DOE set up an office there to facilitate the process of enrolling their children in the school. The office provided the kids with backpacks, other school supplies, MetroCards, and bus schedules, they added.

“[Getting them into school] was very easy,” said Escarle Simancas, a Venezuelan-born migrant, after registering her two boys. “They helped us with everything inside.”

Another mother, who recently arrived with her family from Venezuela, said her son Andres will be attending PS 5 in the Bronx, where he was placed in a bilingual program, teaching English one day and Spanish the next.

“He learns very quickly; he’s really smart,” said the mother.

Additional reporting by Matthew Sedacca

https://nypost.com/2022/09/10/flood-of-migrant-kids-in-nyc-schools-to-boost-doe-funding/ Flood of migrant children in New York schools to boost DOE funding

JACLYN DIAZ

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