“Fantastic Four” film should have a focus on the 1960s: comic book legend

The 1960s were a fantastic time for comics.

It was the decade that Jack Kirby, Stan Lee, and the pioneers of Marvel introduced the Earth 616 troupe of beloved superheroes to our mortal universe, including Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man, The X-Men” and perhaps the most famous crime-fighting quartet in the world: “The Fantastic Four”.

For the latter — whose 21st-century on-screen performances in 2005, 2007, and 2015 weren’t as fantastically received by fans and critics alike — the return to those early glory days could set the record for proper Marvel cinematic of the Baxter’s tenants Fix Building Universe launch in November 2024, said famed comics writer and illustrator Alex Ross.

Ross, who published “Fantastic Four: Full Circle” on Tuesday, told The Post that beginning the Four’s MCU journey in the 1960s is “the constant drumbeat that fans are pushing for.” His new work recreates such a story from the early era about the dark dimension of the “negative zone” and the design style pioneered by Kirby and Lee.

“To put them in the 1960s so they’re time-bound to that original time so you can get some of that vibe from the period. And then finally they can [time] Travel around and get from there to the present,” Ross said of the upcoming MCU film, adding that he could give fans a “pretty nice” glimpse into superhero life of this decade that hasn’t really been seen in cinemas yet .

“I think it would be a real win to take her back to when pop stars became such an angry thing and show what her fame is like [status] was kind of a thing that they had to live with during that time… and they get to meet the Beatles.”

The maneuver – similar to how Captain America began in its WWII setting in the MCU – would also serve to connect younger fans to the OG days of comics and show how central characters like Reed Richards, Ben Grimm, and Sue and Johnny Storm was part of Marvel’s interloping hero dynamic.

Tackling new Fantastic Four projects like the original 1960s comics is the way forward for Marvel, says comics artist Alex Ross.
Tackling new Fantastic Four projects like the original 1960s comics is the way forward for Marvel, says comics artist Alex Ross.
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Ross, who was released "Fantastic Four: Complete Circle" On Tuesday, The Post said the beginning of the four's MCU journey dates back to the 1960s "the constant drum beat that the fans are pushing for."
Ross, who published “Fantastic Four: Full Circle” on Tuesday, told The Post that beginning the Four’s MCU journey in the 1960s is “the constant drumbeat that fans are pushing for.”
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“It’s where Marvel really begins, not only is it the first comic book that opens the Marvel Universe, but it’s also the one that introduces the most relevant and important parts of that universe,” Ross said. “If you go back to Spider Man’s first issue number one, that [Fantastic Four are] in the same issue, [Marvel is] It shows you right away that this is an integrated universe of characters that regularly overlap and clash.”

The only potential glimpse fans got of the new film was John Krasinski’s cameo as Richards’ Mr. Fantastic in an alternate Earth 838 in last year’s Dr. Strange and the Multiverse of Madness.” It remains unclear if Krasinski will continue playing Mr. Fantastic for upcoming MCU projects.

In addition to establishing a setting that was neglected in previous versions of the four, Ross says there’s still an important part of their story that badly needs revising.

The upcoming Fantastic Four movie has a chance to reveal a lot about Dr. Getting Doom right that hasn't appeared in movies yet.
The upcoming Fantastic Four movie has a chance to reveal a lot about Dr. Getting Doom right that hasn’t appeared in movies yet.
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nemesis Dr. Victor of Doom.

“Well, for one thing, you have to make him realize right away that he’s somehow related to the four of them,” Ross said. “That’s the gimmick [that’s been used] for three running films. They came up with this concept because it was a five-person team and he was kind of there and then kind of broke off to go crazy… That’s something we don’t need.”

Instead, it would do best to portray the mad scientist much closer to his roots from both the comics and royalty in the fictional European nation of Latveria, according to the illustrator.

“Show he’s more than just a guy in an iron suit – he’s a monarch and in control of a nation,” Ross added. “These are distinct traits that the movies didn’t fully address, they end up giving him electric powers or something… He might be their most famous villain, but it still breaks it when they constantly make him a fifth member.” do who just went rogue.”

The upcoming film also offers an opportunity to make amends for another rogue cut that was set to appear in a related installment of the films before Captain America Chris Evans, Jessica Alba, Ioan Gruffudd and Michael Chiklis in the early 2000s.

Chris Evans as Johnny Storm in 2005 "Fantastic Four."
Chris Evans as Johnny Storm in 2005’s Fantastic Four.
AP

Appearing like a phantom in just the final minutes of 2007’s The Rise of the Silver Surfer, the powerful and fearsome Galactus is now ready to wreak havoc across the Marvel Universes, Ross said.

“As it turned out [Marvel] postponed the idea of ​​bringing Galactus in physical form as they thought they had enough hits to feature Galactus in Silver Surfer’s own film,” Ross said. “Because that didn’t happen in the end. The main goal is: get him there, just as people remember him, bring out the impressive magnitude of his size.”

https://nypost.com/2022/09/07/fantastic-four-film-should-have-a-1960s-focus-comic-legend/ “Fantastic Four” film should have a focus on the 1960s: comic book legend

Emma Bowman

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