California mosquito and Fairview fires destroy buildings and force residents to flee

MICHIGAN BLUFF, Calif. — California’s latest major wildfire destroyed buildings and cars as it burned out of control in the Sierra Nevada, while the fires also forced people to flee their homes in the southern part of the state.

Evacuation orders and warnings were in effect in Placer and El Dorado counties Thursday after the mosquito fire grew to nearly 6.5 square miles without containment.

Several buildings and at least 10 cars were burned near the Michigan Bluff gold rush-era community about an hour northwest of Sacramento.

A firefighter battles the wildfire in the Fairview area of ​​California.
A firefighter battles the wildfire in the Fairview area of ​​California.
CAL FIRE/Riverside County Fire Department

In Southern California, the deadly Fairview fire grew to more than 15 square miles as it sent out a huge plume of smoke near the town of Hemet in Riverside County, southeast of Los Angeles. Only 5% were contained and evacuation orders were extended Wednesday afternoon.

The fire broke out in triple-digit heat on Monday and quickly spread, killing two people who were found in a vehicle, severely burning another person, destroying seven buildings and damaging several others.

“Unfortunately, we are currently unable to positively identify the victims. But we believe they were from the same family,” Sheriff’s Sgt. Brandi Schwan said. “It appears the two victims found in the vehicle are attempting to flee the fire.”

The injured person was only identified as a woman. Swan said she was expected to survive.

The cause of the fire was determined. Southern California Edison told the California Public Utilities Commission that “circuit activity” was taking place shortly before the fire was reported, according to the Los Angeles Times. The activity was not specified.

About 35 miles north, smoke billowed over ski slopes in the San Bernardino Mountains as the Radford Fire fed on timber stands south of the Big Bear Lake resort area.

The fire has spread over 1.5 square miles since it was spotted by a US Forest Service helicopter crew Monday afternoon. Only 2% was included.

A burned pickup truck stands in front of a home on Wakefield Avenue destroyed by the mill fire September 3, 2022 in Weed, California.
A burned pickup truck stands in front of a home on Wakefield Avenue destroyed by the mill fire September 3, 2022 in Weed, California.
AP
Smoke rises from a wildfire burning on a hilltop near Hemet, California, Tuesday, September 6, 2022.
Smoke rises from a wildfire burning on a hillside near Hemet, California on Tuesday, September 6, 2022.
AP

Meanwhile, a wood products company said Wednesday it was investigating whether a fire that killed two people as it swept through the Northern California town of Weed was caused by the possible failure of a water spray machine used to cool the ash at its veneer plant was used.

Roseburg said his fund will support residents with temporary housing, medical supplies and treatment, transportation, clothing, food and water, and childcare services.

Near the Oregon border, the mountain fire covered more than 18 square miles of Siskiyou County and was 30% contained. It started on September 2nd.

https://nypost.com/2022/09/08/california-mosquito-and-fairview-fires-destroy-structures-force-residents-to-flee/ California mosquito and Fairview fires destroy buildings and force residents to flee

JACLYN DIAZ

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