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Brit tracks thousands of asteroids from the top of a Welsh hill to save humanity from the apocalypse

IN the NETFLIX apocalyptic comedy “Don’t Look Up”, two scientists must convince the world that a planet-destroying asteroid is headed for Earth.

Just like in the movies, humanity’s survival in such an event really falls into the hands of a few brave individuals – including Jay Tate.

Jay Tate is a former British Army Major who helped Nasa track down potential doomsday space rocks.

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Jay Tate is a former British Army Major who helped Nasa track down potential doomsday space rocks.Credit: The Sun
The Space Guard Center is a hilltop observatory in Wales that monitors thousands of nearby asteroids and comets.

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The Space Guard Center is a hilltop observatory in Wales that monitors thousands of nearby asteroids and comets.Credit: The Sun

The former British Army Major heads the Space Guard Centre, a hilltop observatory in Wales that monitors thousands of nearby asteroids and comets.

He’s part of a global effort by scientists and amateur astronomers to carefully monitor space objects that could threaten life on Earth.

“There are a number of dangers that we as a species face,” Jay, who served 26 years in the Army specializing in surface-to-air missile systems, told The Sun.

“Perhaps the only thing that can trigger a mass extinction in such a short time is the threat posed by asteroids and comets.”

CHELYABINSK EXPLOSION

While the world’s destructive near-Earth objects (NEOs) are few and far between, even smaller objects can wreak havoc on Earth.

On February 15, 2013, CCTV in the Russian city of Chelyabinsk captured something startling and terrifying.

A meteor the size of a six-story building broke up and exploded while flying through the sky about 28 miles from the city.

The explosion did not kill anyone but injured more than a thousand people and smashed the windows of more than 3,000 apartment buildings.

But the most disturbing thing about the explosion was the fact that no one saw it coming – not even those who were looking.

Jay told The Sun: “We were expecting the transit of a fairly large asteroid around seven in the evening.”

“At half past six in the morning I got a phone call from a newspaper saying ‘tell us about this asteroid’.

“I said, ‘Why now? It didn’t happen until tonight.” They said, “No, an incident just broke out in Russia.”

Therefore, a global system of observatories that monitor the whereabouts of known asteroids is crucial to ensuring humanity is safe from space objects.

USE THE FINAL SPACE

The Space Guard Center tracks asteroids discovered primarily by US-funded search programs.

Over the years, Jay calculates his team has tracked up to 10,000 asteroids.

Whenever conditions permit, Jay activates Spaceguard’s telescopes and begins work on finding asteroids identified by various surveying stations, usually in the United States.

Each day, he receives a list of Objects from the Minor Planets Center – the global library of known asteroids and comets, which keeps track of what’s spinning in their cosmic region. ta.

Jay then uses this data to determine the positions of objects in the night sky.

“The aim of the game is to take sets of images of each object to determine its orbit around the sun,” Jay said.

“We can then find out if it’s a problem.”

DODGING DOOMSDAY

As Spaceguard and other teams around the globe re-submitted their data, a map of the orbits of these space bullets was gradually built.

Nasa has been tracking NEOs since the 1970s, and in 1994, the US Congress received a mandate from the US Congress to find any objects larger than a kilometer in size. By 2010, they had removed it.

Since then, smaller objects have become the focus of NEO hunters, with more than 24,000 discovered to date. No one is currently believed to pose a threat.

If they came into contact with Earth, most of the NEO – about the size of a car – would burn up harmlessly in our atmosphere.

However, larger objects will overcome our planet’s natural defenses.

Jay told The Sun: “To come up with a reasonably sized country or a small continent, you might need something about a hundred and fifty meters across.

“For global effects, you need something that’s maybe a kilometer or two across. Mass extinctions start to spread between 5 and 10 kilometers.”

Currently, the risk from all observable objects in our solar system is very low. But for Jay, there was no reason for him to let his guard down, or his telescope.

“Do you have insurance on your home? The answer is almost certainly yes,” he said. “The next question is, why?

“Did you predict it would burn down? No! Well, why would you protect it.”

Jay is part of a global effort by scientists and amateur astronomers to carefully monitor space objects that could threaten life on Earth.

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Jay is part of a global effort by scientists and amateur astronomers to carefully monitor space objects that could threaten life on Earth.Credit: The Sun
Leonardo Dicaprio as scientist Randall Mindy in'Don't Look Up'

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Leonardo Dicaprio as scientist Randall Mindy in ‘Don’t Look Up’Credit: Netflix
NASA wants you to protect Earth – see if you qualify for their DART asteroid protection mission

In other news, scientists are embarking on a mission to unravel the mystery behind dozens of creepy baby mummy was buried in an underground tomb in Sicily.

The police caught an Italian mafia henchman who was on the run for 20 years after discovering the fugitive on Google Maps.

One of the The best preserved fossils was found that confirmed that juvenile dinosaurs popped out of their shells like baby birds.

And, one eagle-eyed Reddit user made $2 billion fly stealth bomber on Google Maps.


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https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/17253271/brit-tracks-nearby-asteroids-nasa-save-humanity-apocalypse/ Brit tracks thousands of asteroids from the top of a Welsh hill to save humanity from the apocalypse

Huynh Nguyen

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