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Ashley Biggs police recall a horror scene after a man who lured his ex to his death with a fake pizza delivery order from Domino was abandoned

INVESTIGATORS have re-investigated the horrifying murder of an Army veteran-turned-pizza delivery boy, who was lured to his death by her ex-husband in a bogus order for dominoes.

Ashley Biggs, 25, was found strangled in a cornfield in New Franklin, Ohio, in June 2012 after disappearing during an overnight delivery to a local business – her last that evening.

Ashley Biggs, 25, was found strangled in a corn field in New Franklin, Ohio, in June 2012

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Ashley Biggs, 25, was found strangled in a corn field in New Franklin, Ohio, in June 2012
She disappeared after tagging a late-night pizza delivery. Blood was found at the address given

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She disappeared after tagging a late-night pizza delivery. Blood was found at the address givenPhoto credit: Court TV

Biggs, who was then embroiled in a bitter custody battle with her ex-husband Chad CobbShe was specifically asked to carry the pizza around behind the store and meet the customer in the parking lot.

Her colleagues had expected her to be back from the run quickly, but the minutes turned into more than an hour and there was no sign of Biggs.

After several unsuccessful attempts to reach her on her cell phone, Biggs’ manager decided to call the police around 1 a.m.

BLOODY SCENE

In a clip shared exclusively with The Sun, New Franklin Police Department detective Michael Hitchings recalls arriving on the scene at Court TV as part of the upcoming true-crime series Someone They Knew…With Tamron Hall.

“When we showed up at the original location, there was evidence that there was a fight going on,” Hitchings said.

“You could see someone being picked up and placed in a vehicle – and that vehicle was being driven away.”

Also covering the case for the network, Nic Edwards, host of the True Crime Garage podcast, noted how investigators found “a large amount of blood on the sidewalk” and “skid marks” leading away from the store.

Police discovered Biggs’ body in a cornfield the next day. Cobb was arrested shortly thereafter when the police found him hiding in a nearby forest.

Investigators later discovered that Cobb — who had a history of domestic violence allegations related to Biggs — had lured her to her death with the help of his new partner, Erica Stefanko.

WRONG ORDER

At Cobb’s request, Stefanko placed a fake pizza order under an alias, giving the address of a closed store in New Franklin.

Cobb then assaulted Biggs, the mother of his seven-year-old daughter, in the parking lot outside the store, where he attacked her and then strangled her to death.

Stefanko and Cobb then dumped Biggs’ body in the cornfield before returning home and washing away evidence of the crime.

Cobb pleaded guilty to the case in 2013 and was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Stefanko would not be arrested for her role in the heinous crime for another six years, as police said new evidence had come to light implicating her as an accomplice.

The breakthrough came through a secretly recorded phone call between Stefanko and Cobb’s mother, Cindee, who testified that Stefanko admitted ordering the pizza and trying to cover up the murder.

“Every time I hear a siren, I’m like, ‘They’re coming for me,'” Stefanko said, according to the Cobb Akron Beacon Journal.

“I’ve done my part. I did exactly what he told me to do,” she continued, adding that the couple had plotted to kill Biggs to prevent her from getting custody of Cobb’s daughter.

At one point in the recording, Stefanko claimed Cobb told her he wanted to save Bigg’s skull “as a trophy.”

accomplice caught

Both the then 15-year-old Biggs daughter and Cobb testified against Stefanko during her November 2020 trial.

Cobb’s daughter described Stefanko as mentally and physically abusive.

“She would tell me that if I told my father what she was doing to me, she would get worse,” the girl told the court.

“I remember she held me on the ground and hit me, and then she made me eat dog poop too.”

When asked by the court why, she replied, “Because she was jealous of my relationship with my father.”

The teenager added that she was in the back seat of a car in a “pitch black place” when she heard it Place an order with Stefanko for a pizza under an assumed name.

She said she fell asleep in the car and woke up later the next morning at her great-grandparents’ house.

Cobb pleaded guilty to the case in 2013 and was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole

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Cobb pleaded guilty to the case in 2013 and was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parolePhoto credit: Summit County Sheriff’s Office
The clothes Cobb was wearing when he murdered Biggs are pictured above

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The clothes Cobb was wearing when he murdered Biggs are pictured abovePhoto credit: Court TV
Investigators found skid marks leading away from the crime scene

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Investigators found skid marks leading away from the crime scenePhoto credit: Court TV

Cobb testified at the trial from prison via video link.

He said he “walked in circles” near a tree in the parking lot, dressed in camouflage, while waiting for Stefanko to place the wrong order.

“Is it fair to say Ashley didn’t leave the parking lot alive that night?” asked Assistant District Attorney Brian LoPrinzi.

“Yes sir, that is correct,” Cobb replied.

Stefanko was found guilty of murder and aggravated murder.

She pleaded for leniency in her sentence, adding through tears: “I want to be with my family again one day. I love my children more than my life.”

The judge handed Stefanko a life sentence. She is eligible for parole in 30 years.

In Someone The Knew, detective Michael Hitchings says Biggs’ murder rocked the small town of New Franklin, which he described as having close ties.

A friend of Biggs also opens up about the upcoming program, remembering her as “one in a million.”

“If you met her once, you would never forget her,” they said. “Ashley was the kindest, gentlest soul you could ever meet.

“She loved everyone, there wasn’t a mean bone in Ashley’s body.”

NEW SERIES

Someone They Knew premieres March 6 at 9pm ET on Court TV.

The series, hosted by award-winning journalist Tamron Hall, will air weekly episodes chronicling shocking crime stories in which each of the victims had a personal connection to their killer.

In a statement ahead of the series’ premiere, Hall said, “When the idea of ​​a series focusing on intimate partner crimes was presented to me, I felt a deep connection to these victims.

“I’ve always been drawn to the ‘why’ – why crimes like this happen – and the heartbreaking impact they have on family and friends. Court TV represents an additional, trusted partner to support my important work.”

The episode, which focuses on Biggs’ murder, aired on March 20.

Evidence of the murder can be seen above

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Evidence of the murder can be seen abovePhoto credit: Court TV
Erica Stefanko gave the wrong order and was later imprisoned for her role in the murder

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Erica Stefanko gave the wrong order and was later imprisoned for her role in the murderPhoto credit: New Franklin Police Department
Someone They Knew will premiere on Court TV on March 6th at 9pm ET

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Someone They Knew will premiere on Court TV on March 6th at 9pm ET

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https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/17858014/ashley-biggs-murder-pizza-delivery-true-crime-documentary/ Ashley Biggs police recall a horror scene after a man who lured his ex to his death with a fake pizza delivery order from Domino was abandoned

Bobby Allyn

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